PetaPixel

Facebook Increases Maximum Photo Size to 2048px, Adds Lightbox

Just earlier this year Facebook upped their maximum photo size to 720px, an increase of 20%. Today, they’ve announced that the maximum size is increasing to 2048px, about eight times larger than the previous maximum size. A download link will be included with photos allowing people to download the high resolution versions.

They’re also launching a new light box photo viewer, similar to the feature Flickr launched recently:

These features will be rolled out to the entire Facebook community over the next few weeks. Read the Facebook announcement on their blog here.

Facebook is already the largest photo sharing service on the web (by far), but it hasn’t become legitimate among serious photographers in the ways Flickr or Smugmug have. What do you think Facebook would need to do to have photographers take the service more seriously — and possibly consider leaving their existing service?


Image credit: Photograph by Andrew Bosworth


 
  • http://www.facebook.com/cuttriss Chris Cuttriss

    Only when Facebook creates a photographers-rights friendly TOS (similar to Flickr) will it become a reasonable platform for photography. The majority of photographers I follow on Facebook link out from their streams to their services of choice and that will be a difficult trend to curtail.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=525857508 Tom Olesnevich

    If they’re still stripping EXIF data out, then serious photographers will continue to disregard it.

  • Darko

    I’ve never really read the copyrights page but I know some photographers (Scott Bourne) have written negative posts on Facebook and the ownership of the photos. I don’t mind people taking my 720 px watermarked photos but at 2000px the issue of copyright becomes even bigger.

  • Guest

    Did you see this on Mashable?

  • Bobbler

    Once you post an image on facebook, you pretty much lose all control of it in a way that doesn’t happen on Flickr for example. I’ve seen photos of mine be shortlisted in competitions and crop up on company websites without me having anything to do with it (i.e. without permission)

  • Bobbler

    Once you post an image on facebook, you pretty much lose all control of it in a way that doesn’t happen on Flickr for example. I’ve seen photos of mine be shortlisted in competitions and crop up on company websites without me having anything to do with it (i.e. without permission)

  • http://www.petapixel.com Michael Zhang

    I definitely read that article, but I don’t think it was the first place I saw this story. How come?

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  • http://twitter.com/lukelucas Luke Lucas

    things needed in order for us to start posting example pictures?

    – quit stripping EXIF data
    – some semblance of copy protection
    – an assurance we hold every single right and license to our original work without FB sneaking in some BS about being able to use it for their own purposes.

  • Matt

    Terms of Service needs a DRASTIC rewrite. I put mostly family snapshots on mine, and others are small single images linking to a real protected gallery. Plus Facebook needs to provide a customizable photograph presentation editor for presenting the images in a manner desired by the photographer.

    Serious photographers post on Facebook at their own risk.

  • http://twitter.com/jnskyliner34 Justin Javellana

    i’m doubting the image quality when it’s uploaded. i’ll stick with flickr. :3

  • BecThomasPhoto

    This is just going to increase the rate of photo theft and is not going to draw serious photographers in, only make them even more unhappy…

  • http://joricel.com/ Joey

    Taken from Facebook’s TOR last revised Aug 25, 2010″…you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post…” So users are just supplying Facebook with higher quality photos that Facebook can use for free.

  • Chris

    You missed “including the authority to relicense” that’s my ‘favorite’ part of their horrendous TOS.

  • Chris

    As mentioned here, their TOS is pretty much the worst in the business and they have a long history of recompressing photos, badly. From the looks of images I’ve uploaded, even if I resize to within their limits they take my photo, strip the EXIF data, and recompress it at 20% JPG quality using some JPG algorithm they got out of a 1990 book on image compression.

  • Gallery By Hal

    If Facebook wants photographers to take them seriously they need to re-work their photo deletion processing for Flagged photos. Far too many images are being arbitrarily deleted from photographers’, models’ and artists’ profiles that are in no way in violation of the TOS – it seems to simply accuse an image is reason enough for automatic deletion, regardless of the subject matter portrayed in the image. The Napoleonic Code of Justice has been out of fashion for quite some time now…

  • brian

    No tonly do I not like uploading images that large to the web, but I tend to keep my photos on flickr and my blog and only post links to them on Facebook.

  • http://twitter.com/regi_a Alessandro Reginato

    flickr is still the best method to share the images at a professional level, with the world, not just the friends. the best pics will be always be on flickr

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=503459164 Tyler Webb

    Bingo and Bingo. This scares me for the sake of up and coming photographers who don’t take the time to educate themselves and protect their work.

  • I’m a Pro

    It’s a big NO NO for photographers. Don’t allow people to download the High Resolution photos. There should be settings to not allow other people to download their photos. Because letting strangers to download photos, especially the photos taken by professionals will be an act of stealing. And they can file a case about that.

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  • http://twitter.com/BANANAMANANAS Josh Ladella

    Ugh, I don’t care about resolution, just stop desaturating my pictures Facebook!

  • Jacob

    That’s possibly your browser’s bad colour management rather than Facebook from personal experience.

  • RandHobart

    Facebook isn’t aimed at togs, nor is it punted as an image hosting site, so I fail to see why togs get so uppity about it.

    It’s a social networking site. The image aspect, essentially, is aimed at pretty young things posting dreadful mobile phone-cam images, or Joe Blogs sharing his holiday snaps with family and friends – few of which have any commercial value.

    If you’re worried about copyright violations, don’t post anything usable online. If you’re bothered about how your images are presented, put your hand in your pocket get your own site.

    Simples.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000680756962 Jo S. Haugum

    Their compression is absolutely HORRIBLE. Look at this picture I took of a Ferrari on facebook: https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/255680_220168314682525_100000680756962_753658_4120650_n.jpg and the same picture on flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/haugum/5651111707/in/set-72157626944129010/lightbox/
    Absolutely unacceptable.

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  • Michael Floyd

    Not to argue, and I agree with what you are saying, but we have the option of not uploading photos to facebook – or not posting anything at all for that matter. 

    Maybe a good idea would be to simply post links from facebook to your other outside accounts such as flickr, or to your own website.

  • Michael Floyd

    That’s the best answer I’ve heard so far. Agreed.

  • Guest

    Facebook isn’t for commercial photographers, or businesses of any sort, they don’t care about your needs, this is just so average people can upload pics that look a little better, for commercial use they would just as soon you use some other site to host files

  • Guest

    Facebook isn’t for commercial photographers, or businesses of any sort, they don’t care about your needs, this is just so average people can upload pics that look a little better, for commercial use they would just as soon you use some other site to host files

  • 2wid

    does anyone know what’s the actual display size now (not the download one) checked it myself and it seems to be 960px by (whatever format you have) … is that correct?

  • None

    As long as they compress the images to an unacceptable quality level, nobody will be interested in licensing them of even using them unless they’re cheap bast@rds… So if they “new user” falls in that category, there will also be nothing to sue for…

  • Afsafsfas

    its back to 620px now fb sucks for pics

  • http://profiles.google.com/robertmichaelsalmon Bobby Salmon

    Except for the use of the atrociously hip word “togs”.

  • RBA

    Just to clarify this ancient matter,  FB does indeed screw with colour such that spots of high saturation become washed out.

  • Craig

    960px is the maximum size that fb will post (if you do not take into account the download possibilities)

  • Thief

     If you want people to see your pictures, then they have to download them. That’s so obvious that I really don’t understand why I have to write it.

  • courtney mercier

    does anyone know how to get your uploaded images full size on your wall? it seems they are cropping them down

  • http://www.kedr.com.au/ kedR

    Does any one know if the photographer still retains the copyrights of his images if he/she posts them on FB? 

  • http://www.IndianWeddingPhotography.com.au/ Indy

    I posted a 1024 px image and FB compression made it look as if it were 100px and the image got all pixelated. NOT happy – I’d rather use Flikr.

  • http://www.facebook.com/JohnMusser John Musser

    Concur. “Uppity.” Good word. “Social Networking” does not mean “New Marketing Platform.”