photoseries

Compelling Photos Document the Contents of Abandoned Suitcases from a 125-Year-Old Psychiatric Center

Willard Psychiatric Center began its life in 1869 as Willard Asylum for the Insane, closing down over 125 years later in 1995. Thousands of long-term patients passed through its doors, and when the center was shut down, it was discovered that hundreds of suitcases belonging to some of its earliest residents had been set aside and forgotten in one of the hospital's attics.

Those suitcases and their contents have been preserved, catalogued and, thanks to photographer Jon Crispin and his compelling Willard Asylum Suitcases series, now they have been photographed as well.

Parents Recreate Famous Film Scenes with Cardboard Boxes and Their Baby Boy

I don't have kids just yet, so I can't say from experience, but it seems one of the benefits of having a child is the ability to feature the adorable little guy or gal in creative photography projects. Examples abound: from Queenie Liao's wondrous naptime photos, to Nagano Toyokazu's series My Daughter Kanna.

Now, another great project has popped up on our radar. This one is called Cardboard Box Office, and it's the result of a parenting duo's creativity, an excess of packing materials and the addition of a baby boy to the family.

Henry’s Concepts: Adorable Photo Series Directed Entirely by a Two-Year-Old

In order to make a little bit of money on the side, Toronto-based portrait and wedding photographer Alex Neary does some nannying, but she probably never expected that her nannying gig would be her ticket to viral photography success.

You see, for the last year and a half, she's been looking after a ridiculously cute and creative toddler named Henry, who one day decided that he wanted to turn the camera around and photograph Alex for a change. Thus was born the adorable photo series Henry's Concepts.

54 Reasons to Love Photography in 2013

As a self-appointed pundit, I spend a fair amount of time criticizing the photography industry, but I have a little secret ... I love photography! And 2013 brought yet another year full of strange, interesting and inspiring moments in photography. Let’s go on a little journey ... in no particular order.

The Entrancing and Surreal Self-Portraiture of Kyle Thompson

There are selfies, and then there are self-portraits. Make no mistake, these are two very different things, in the same way that a photograph differentiates itself from a snapshot. So while the word 'selfie' might be in the midst of experiencing its 15 minutes of fame, it would be an injustice to call photographer Kyle Thompson's gripping self-portraits 'selfies.'

Humor: Portraits of Wet Dogs Taken Mid-Bath

Our quest to continue giving dogs the attention they deserve in the photography world continues (for the record, we don't dislike cats... we just think they get too much attention). We've had dogs shaking, dogs licking and now, for the sake of rhyming, dogs dripping.

This series is called Wet Dog, and it's a fun and funny series by pet photographer Sophie Gamand of Striking Paws Photography.

Evolution: Striking Black and White Photos of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries

Working in concert with publisher Xavier Barral and writer/scientist Dr. Jean-Baptiste de Panafieu, photographer Patrick Gries has put together a book/photo series packed full of striking black and white photographs of vertebrate skeletons -- from tiny creatures to massive elephants, his book Evolution covers a vast swath of vertebrate natural history.

Parents Keep Their Kids’ Imaginations Alive with Creative ‘Dinovember’ Project

Parents Refe and Susan Tuma aren't big on Movember, at their house November is reserved for a different tradition: Dinovember. Documented in photos on the project's Facebook page, the Tumas spend November keeping their kids' imaginations alive by convincing them that every night, their dinosaur toys come to life and get into all sorts of trouble.

Strangers: A Bizarre Series of Composite Portraits, Each Made Up of 200 Close-Ups

Photographer Pelle Cass is fond of composites. The set of so-called 'single frame time-lapses' he put together for his Selected People series has gone quite viral.

But his fondness for composite photography doesn't stop at creating overcrowded scenes, he applied the same approach to taking portraits, creating a bizarre (and perhaps a little unsettling) series of portraits called Strangers in the process.

Athletes Among Us: Pics of Professional Athletes Playing at Life

What do you do when your last photo series went viral and earned you numerous awards and accolades? Well, if you're Jordan Matter, the photographer behind the wildly popular photo series and book Dancers Among Us, you move on to the next great idea.

For him, that means taking the original idea and tweaking it a bit. First he did Dancers Among Us, now he's capturing the dedicated and passionate lives of those professional Athletes Among Us.

Liquid Jewels: Photos of Paint-Covered Balloons Milliseconds After They Pop

Back in March, we shared Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner's Black Holes series of photographs showing paint being flung outwards by a spinning drill. We told you then that Oefner's stated goal was to "harness elemental forms of natural phenomena and capture them in the most stunning way possible."

His most recent project takes another stab at that goal, this time using paint and modeling balloons to create a series of photographs he's calling Liquid Jewels.

Photos of Falling Subjects Moments from Disaster

Photographer Brad Hammonds is fascinated by a concept that he calls "emotional delay." It's the idea that no moment is truly experienced until it has already passed. In the time the moment is happening, the brain is processing it. By the time the experience comes, the moment is actually gone.

His most recent series Falling Through Space explores this concept in an interesting way, by trying to get the viewer to experience the terrifying moment in the photo while the subject himself (or herself) is still processing.

Stunning Macro Photographs of Animal Eyes

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but in the case of Suren Manvelyan's macro photography, it's just in the eye. After his extreme close-up photos of both human and animal eyes went viral one right after the other, Manvelyan decided to continue seeking out more beauty in the eyes of animals by releasing a part two to the amazing series we shared with you back in 2011.

Photo Series Illustrates Crayon Colors by Using the Objects They’re Named After

Crayola Crayons -- the tools with which many a toddler has decorated many a refrigerator door -- all have interesting real-world names. Some strange colors like 'Flesh' have been understandably renamed. But many equally interesting colors have remained staples in the coloring world, and it's these colors that photographer Daniel Seung Lee and art director Dawn Kim set out to capture in their collaborative series Crayola Theory.