giant

‘Attack of the Giant Fingers’ Pays Tribute to the Digits that Invade Our Photos

Somewhere deep in the depths of our archives, it’s inevitable that every single one of us has an image with our finger in it. Whether a family portrait gone bad or an accidental misfire by a stranger helping you take a shot, it seems like our fleshly phalanges have a knack for getting in the way.

To honor these accidents, Erik Kessels has created a photo series and accompanying book titled Attack of the Giant Fingers. As the 13th section of his larger, ongoing collection titled In Almost Every Picture, this series sheds light on the darker days of analogue when you couldn’t ‘chimp’ to see if your finger invaded the frame.

Nikon D800X: A Huge D800 DSLR Replica Created Out of Styrofoam

Yage Yang of Taipei, Taiwan is passionate about two things: snapping photos with his camera and building things with his hands. In June 2012, he decided that he would build a giant replica of a Nikon D800 out of styrofoam, just for fun. The project took him an entire year to complete, but the result, a "Nikon D800X," is ridiculously impressive.

This Gigantic Tintype Camera Shoots the Analog Equivalent of Gigapixel Photos

Gigapixel photography is all the rage these days, as photographers all over the world compete to hold the record for "world's largest photo," but one photographer in San Francisco is participating in a very different way.

Michael Shindler, a photographer at the tintype studio Photobooth, has built a custom giant tintype camera that shoots portraits that are the analog equivalent of a gigapixel photo.

Coins of the World Photographed Using Europe’s Best Microscope

Did you know that it costs the US Mint 2 cents to produce every 1 cent coin due to the cost of materials and production? Countries such as Canada have already done away with their lowest denomination coins due to their costs and lack of usefulness.

As these "worthless" coins cause debates in their governments about whether or not they should be abolished, photographer Martin John Callanan is on a mission to save them... not as a currency, but rather in photographs.

There Are Giant Camera Resolution Test Charts Scattered Across the US

When people test cameras and lenses for resolution, they commonly use special resolution test charts that are filled with black bars of varying lengths and thicknesses. They're kind of like eye charts, except for cameras instead of eyeballs, and with lines instead of letters.

Well, did you know that in dozens of locations around the United States, there are gigantic resolution test charts on the ground?

Capturing the Second Largest Tree in the World in a Single Image

For a recent National Geographic story on giant sequoia trees, photographer Michael “Nick” Nichols was tasked with capturing a photograph showing the sheer size of one of the largest trees in the world. The video above offers a short but interesting glimpse into how Nichols and his team went about doing so.

A Little More Sigma 200-500 “SigZilla” Fun

SigZilla is gone now. You’ll be able to see its work in action if you watch the World Series. I wouldn’t be surprised if you catch a glimpse of it mounted to FOX’s Vision Research camera. Before it left, though, we were able to -- with a great deal of difficulty -- get it mounted in the lab and run one basic Imatest series.

Hyperphotos That Show Surreal Worlds in Mind-Boggling Detail

Gigapixel photographs are generally created by snapping a large number of photos of a scene using a special robotic camera rig, and then stitching those images together afterward using special software. Jean-François Rauzier creates similarly massive images, except his "hyperphotos" are all stitched together by hand.

The World’s Largest Holga Camera is 20 Times Bigger Than the Real Thing

The folks over at Tucson, Arizona-based ArtsEye Gallery love the Holga so much, that decided to create a gigantic version of the plastic 120 format toy camera for an annual photo competition they host. They were originally planning to create it as a fun prop, but midway through the construction process, they had the brilliant idea of making it as a functioning camera.

Olympic-Sized Meals on Oversized Place Settings

Photographer Michael Bodiam and set designer Sarah Parker were recently commissioned by NOWNESS to shoot a project called "A Day on My Plate: Athletes' Meals". The goal was to document Olympic athlete meals, but with a twist: instead of standard perspectives, the massive amounts of food were placed onto oversized place settings created with laser-cut MDF, cardboard and paper. Parker says,

I wanted people to be able to draw direct comparison between the diets, and to produce something quite playful that subtly hinted at the sport each athlete participated in.

See if you can pick up on the "subtle hints" and guess the sports behind the meals (answers at the end).

Clever Photos of Tiny People Living in a World of Giant Food

Big Appetites is a project by photographer Christopher Boffoli that features miniature people living in a world of giant food. The subjects are seen mining for strawberry seeds, chopping up giant blocks of chocolate, and lobster wrangling. Each of the figures (meant for miniature train models) are hand-painted with meticulous detail.

German Garbage Men Turn Dumpsters Into Giant Pinhole Cameras

A group of garbage men in Hamburg have figured out a way to combine their love of photography with their work of hauling trash, turning large dumpsters into giant pinhole cameras to photograph their city. The dumpsters are converted by drilling tiny holes into the fronts and then hanging large sheets of photo paper inside. Although framing a shot with the giant rolling cameras takes only a minute, exposing it can take up to an hour of waiting. They've dubbed the experiment the "Trashcam Project".

Incredible Wallpaper Created Using 88,000 Photographs of the Sky

Skycatcher Wallpaper is a monumental display created by artists Jonathan Puckey and Luna Maurer. It's composed of a whopping 88,000 individual photographs of the sky above Amsterdam captured over two years with the camera snapping a photo every five minutes. Each vertical strip contains 144 photographs and shows exactly one day. The gradual change in the number of daylight hours results in fluctuations in the shape of the blue daylight sections of the wallpaper.

Quirky Camera Head Photographs

Japanese photographer kiyoshimachine has a quirky set of photographs titled Monster67 that features people wearing the "67 Head", a giant Pentax SLR.

Basketball Fan’s Secret Weapon is a Giant Photo of His Own Face

An Alabama basketball fan named Jack Blankenship has been attracting quite a bit of media attention for his creative method of distracting opposing players when they shoot free throws: Blankenship printed out a giant photograph of himself making a strange face and waves it around while making the same face. His antics quickly caught the attention of sports writers, television cameras, and the Internet -- one screen grab from a recent game has been viewed over half a million times already online.

Gigantic Museum-Quality Canvas Prints Free For the Taking

Back in September we featured a project called This Was Found that promotes art by leaving framed prints out and about in the UK. Now, printing company Jondo is taking it to the next level with a project called Art Heist. They've left 26 gigantic, museum-quality 40x60inch canvases in various secret locations around Los Angeles. Find one, and you're free to take it home. Just make sure you have a good way of bringing home the massive photo!