freephotos

Hey, Photographers: When You Give It Away, You Diminish All of Our Work

I don’t think I’m a particularly brilliant photographer. Sure, I’ve carved out a little niche here in a small part of the world and my landscape photography is relatively well known among the local community, but I’m no big-shot Instagram influencer, I haven’t got a nationally or internationally recognizable name, and I sure as s**t do not earn a living from photography.

Why I Rejected Your Request for Free Photos

This post is dedicated to all the people who have completely lost their sense of common decency. I have a destructive humbleness that most people do not understand (myself included). I do not have a Patreon page, I do not run ads on my website, I have never asked for donations. However, for some reason, I get the feeling that this leads people to believe I do everything for free. This could not be further from the truth. You want to use my work? Great! How about you pay me for it? No? Of course not, what was I thinking. I’m sorry.

I Said No to TIME’s Request for Free ‘User-Generated Content’

I’ve been a professional photojournalist for 24 years and I’ve seen major changes in my industry. I’ve gone from film to digital. I’ve seen the reduction of staff, the reduction of print pages, and even the complete shut down of newspapers and magazines. And I’ve been at the forefront of the explosion of the World Wide Web and digital content.

That Time I Said ‘F*** No’ to a Hotel’s ‘Advertising Opportunity’

My name is Ryan Horban and I’m a wedding photographer based in Southern California. I shoot 30+ weddings a year, drink IPAs because they are tasty and get me buzzed, have an amazing family that I absolutely love, and won’t be staying at a Sheraton Hotel anytime in the near future unless I’m kidnapped by terrorists and held against my will at a Sheraton property.

Wanted: Wedding Photography in Exchange for Free Instagram Publicity

Instagram has over 400 million active users now, and top photographers on the service can make thousands of dollars per photo by promoting products. With the value of Instagram followers increasing, it seems that some people are now trying to use their follower counts to get free photography.

A young couple in Chicago posted an ad this week that was aimed at photographers (and other vendors) who would be willing to offer their photography (and other services) in exchange for free publicity... through an Instagram account with 17,600 followers.

When a Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographer is Asked for Free Photos…

Want to see how a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer responds to a request for free images in exchange for "credit" from a major news corporation? You can, because that exchange happened a few days ago.

David Carson is photojournalist with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch who won the Pulitzer Prize with his paper this year for his coverage of protests in Ferguson, Missouri. Last Friday, Carson was contacted by what appears to be a CBS account on Twitter that regularly Tweets requests for image usage.

Photographer Trades Open Letters with the Band Garbage Over Free Photo Request

The photography and music worlds are at odds in a dispute between a music photographer and a popular band. Photographer Pat Pope was miffed by a request from the band to include his photos in an upcoming book without any payment, while the band Garbage argues that they've already paid Pope for his work, and that they were simply giving him a chance to have his work represented in the publication.

WANTED: Free Photos

A few weeks ago, I was perusing my Facebook newsfeed as I usually do first thing in the morning, a cup of hot coffee in one hand, a computer mouse in the other, when I happened upon a post that stopped me dead in my tracks.

"Hey, everyone! I need a photographer to take some professional photos of me. I won't pay you, but I have connections, so I'm a good person to have in your court, if you know what I mean. I could definitely open some doors for you." 

Gone in 30 Seconds: Photog Holds Show and Invites Strangers to Steal His Photos

Copenhagen, Denmark-based photographer Lukas Renlund recently came up with a neat way of drumming up some excitement over his photographs. He held a public photo exhibition called "Steal My Photograph!" that turned out to be possibly the world's shortest show. After hanging up 40 framed photographs on a wall outdoors, Renlund invited passersby to take any single photograph they desired, with one condition: they had to hang it up, photograph it, and then email the photo and description to Renlund.

Street Photographer Turns His City Into a Free-Art Gallery

Auckland, New Zealand-based street photographer Sim Ahmed of Aucklandia recently decided to spread the love of photography by displaying and offering his work for free on the streets of his city. After printing out 500 digital prints for 9 cents each three weeks ago, he began framing them, revisiting the locations where they were shot, and sticking them on buildings there.

Gigantic Museum-Quality Canvas Prints Free For the Taking

Back in September we featured a project called This Was Found that promotes art by leaving framed prints out and about in the UK. Now, printing company Jondo is taking it to the next level with a project called Art Heist. They've left 26 gigantic, museum-quality 40x60inch canvases in various secret locations around Los Angeles. Find one, and you're free to take it home. Just make sure you have a good way of bringing home the massive photo!