Posts Tagged ‘year’

Feast Your Eyes on This Year’s Sony World Photography Award Winners

Sara Naomi Lewkowicz

The World Photography Organisation has officially announced the winners from all 14 of the categories of the Sony World Photography Awards. From 140,000 photographers across 166 countries, 14 photographers’ works have been chosen as some of the greatest imagery captured this past year. Read more…

Hyperlapse Packs 14 Months Into 2 Minutes While Constantly Shifting Seasons

We’ve shared plenty of time-lapse videos before, and even some hyperlapse videos, but I don’t think we’ve ever shared anything quite like this. Created by Piotr Wancerz, this incredible hyperlapse video captures various locations in Cracow, Poland over the course of 14 months in a way that sets it apart from anything else we’ve run across. Read more…

Time-Lapse: 15 Months of a Forest’s Life in 3 Minutes

Photographer Samuel Orr shot 40,000 photographs over 15 months (between 2006-2008) to create the time-lapse video seen above. It shows the view he had from his front window at the time, from his home in a wooded region just outside Bloomington, Indiana. The short is titled, “Forest Year.”
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One Year’s Worth of Breakfasts Captured in a Single Photo Collage

breakfasts

If you ever have enough patience and dedication to capture one photograph of something each day for an entire year, you should think about creating a collage with the photos once the project is completed. Tiffany Yung snapped photos of breakfasts she ate during 2012 and then created this photo collage once the year was over. She writes,

This is the culmination of my year-long “project.” This is everything I ate for breakfast in 2012 (350 days of breakfast…the 6 days missing are the days I either didn’t get to eat breakfast, or forgot to take a picture). I ate a lot of oatmeal and cereal and bananas and bagels and “jook” (congee) this year. Some mornings, breakfast was “lavish,” while other mornings were smaller and plainer because I had to rush out the door. I love breakfast and I try to never miss it. It can really make or break my day.

You can find a high-resolution version of the collage here. This could make for a neat poster for most subjects — especially the growth of a newborn baby!

Breakfast [Up and Up via Doobybrain]

The Average of All Photos One Man Shot in One Year

Photography enthusiast Sterling Parker created this abstract image by averaging all the photographs he shot in 2007. He tells us,

I have my photos arranged by month, and starting in January 2007, I imported all those photos into GIMP (the freeware image editor) as layers, adjusted the whole canvas to be as big as the largest dimension, then used a custom script to “average” all the layers so each one is an equal relative percentage of the whole. The white background is empty space around photos obviously, and you can see that I took more pictures in landscape than portrait.

After doing that for each month, I averaged all the months together (about 8 months total because I didn’t take pictures some months of that year) and then averaged all the months together. Overall, I’d say this is an average of about 350 photos.

It’s interesting how the image reveals both his preferences for portrait/landscape orientation and also his different camera resolutions.


Image credit: Photograph by Sterling Parker and used with permission

Newspaper Photographer Snapping One Portrait Every Day In His City

Everyday People is a photo project for Oklahoma newspaper Tulsa World by photographer John Clanton. The goal is to meet one new person in the community every day of the year, create a portrait of them, and display the image along with a short blurb about who they are. Clanton writes,

Looking at the 2012 calendar and trying to imagine getting a portrait every single day seemed daunting before I started. Photo Editor Christopher Smith and I refined the idea through several conversations at the end of last year. We picked a consistent, vertical composition, always using a 50mm lens and decided that the discipline of looking for a picture every single day was of utmost importance. I’m not allowed to stockpile pictures and then release them on a different day.

I’m not looking for people who stand out in a crowd. The majority aren’t famous or in positions of power. They’re just Everyday People, like me. They are your neighbors, your co-workers, your kids’ teachers, the guy who prepared your food or the people you drove past on your way to work. They are people who love their work or live for their past-times. They are people with plenty to say or just enough time for a picture. Through these portraits I’m getting to know the city.

Everyday People [Tulsa World]


Thanks for sending in the tip, Mark!

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Man Records 1 Second of Footage from Each Day at Age 30

Cesar Kuriyama spent a couple years saving enough money to take an entire year off from work — his 30th year of life. He spent that year living frugally, doing all the things he never had enough time to do: travelling, personal creative projects, and spending time with family. He decided to document that special year by capturing 1 second of footage every single day and creating a short compilation video at the end, similar to Madeline’s video that we shared back in January. After completing the year, Kuriyama now is planning to capture 1 second from each day for the rest of his life. This means he’ll have a 5-hour video summarizing 50 years of life if he lives to be 80, since every decade creates roughly one hour of video.

(via Coudal)

Guy Documents His Year by Doing One Backflip Per Day

Last week we featured an amazing video by a girl named Madeline who documented 2011 by recording 1 second of footage from each day. The video above by Sam Morrison is similar: Morrison’s father bet him $100 that he couldn’t do a backflip every day of 2011, so he made it his New Year’s resolution to do so. After successfully completing the project, Morrison created the video above showing his favorite flips. The 365 individual videos can be viewed on this Tumblr page dedicated to the project. How’s that for a Project 365?

365-Day Time-Lapse of a Bike Locked on a NYC Sidewalk

Red Peak Branding conducted an experiment last year in which they chained a fully loaded bicycle (bells, basket, lights, and the whole shebang) to a post on a busy New York City sidewalk. They then visited and photographed the bicycle every single day, resulting in the 365-photo time-lapse video seen above. What’s interesting is that the bicycle remains untouched for roughly 230 days, but once small parts start getting stolen the rest of the bicycle soon follows. This might have something to do with what’s called the “broken windows theory“.

(via Gawker)

Girl Documents 2011 With One Second of Video From Each Day

A young woman living in Los Angeles named Madeline did a 365 day project that’s a bit different than most: instead of taking a picture a day, she decided to document each day with roughly one second of footage. At the conclusion of 2011, she combined all 365 video clips into this beautiful 7-minute-long video that offers a glimpse into what her year was like.