Posts Tagged ‘service’

Imgembed Helps You Make Your Photos Easily Embeddable and Monetizable

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Freshly launched over at SXSW 2013 in Austin, Texas, Imgembed is a new startup company that aims to promote the legitimate use of photos online. Well, it’s actually the latest in a string of companies to tackle the embeddable photo concept. For photo purchasers, it’s an easy way to find, pay for, and use images. For photographers, its an easy way to make your images available for purchase.
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Dropbox Updates Android App for Fast and Painless Album Sharing

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Dropbox has been making major moves toward being a series photo-sharing service as of late, and its latest Android app update moves the service one step closer in that direction. The new feature allows users to quickly and easily share entire collections of photographs with friends and family.
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Scoopshot Pro Connects Photo Buyers with Pros Photogs Around the World

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Scoopshot is trying to transform the way companies purchase photos and the way freelance photographers find work. In August, we reported that the startup had launched an app that allows smartphone users to easily sell their photos from their phone. Since then, the company has paid out more than $300,000 to participating photographers, and reports that over 60 of its users have earned more than $1,000 by selling their phone photos (one user has earned more than $23,000)

Now, the service is setting its sights on a different group of photographers: professional freelancers. It has launched Scoopshot Pro, a service that connects photo buyers with photo makers for commissioned projects.
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MyShoebox Launches Free and Unlimited Cloud Storage for Photos

MyShoebox is a new photo storage and sharing service that has been making a splash after launching a little over a week ago. Its offering is easy to describe: free and unlimited cloud storage for photos that can then be viewed from anywhere. Think of it as a Dropbox dedicated to preserving and enjoying photos.
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Instagram Co-Founder Says the Service Needs “To Be A Big Data Company”

Instagram is playing a bigger and bigger part in helping the public see and understand important events. At the GigaOM RoadMap conference held this past Monday, co-founder Kevin Systrom shared his vision of how Instagram needs to become a “big data company”. TechCrunch writes,

Systrom says Instagram’s focus is on “making meaning of all the data coming in, and improving the experience of curating.” For example, he said that there were only 85,000 #SuperBowl Instagrams, compared to the 800,000 #SandyGram. People can’t consume 800,000 photos, but they still want to pull valuable information from them.

He gave an example of how Instagram might one day be able to help “if you’re in New York and want to know what gas stations have gas.” That means both photo recognition, but also natural-language processing. Systrom also hinted at “photo location trends” that show where the most Instagrams are currently being taken.

The element of real-time photo sharing will allow Instagram to do things with photos that most photo-sharing services can’t. It’ll be interesting to see what “big data techniques” the company comes up with for making sense of its massive stream of live imagery.

800K #Sandy-grams Showed Systrom Instagram Is “Going To Need To Be A Big Data Company” [TechCrunch]


P.S. The service also saw 2.1x its normal level of traffic during the election this past Tuesday.


Image credit: Insanity at gas station. So glad I’m a cyclist!!! by Kristine Paulus

Shutterfly Gobbles Up Another Camera Company Photo Sharing Site

Shutterfly is making a habit of gobbling up photo sharing services that camera companies no longer want to run. Less than half a year after acquiring Kodak Gallery from Kodak for a meager $23.8 million, Shutterfly has now taken another photo site off the hands of a company very similar to Kodak: Fujifilm. The Japanese imaging company has agreed to dump its photo sharing and printing business SeeHere into Shutterfly’s lap, shutting down the service on November 8, 2012.
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Stipple Expands Beyond In-Photo Ads to Offer Sharing, Tagging, and Tracking

We first covered Stipple last year, when it was a B2B service that was attempting to turn microstock on its head by offering image licenses in exchange for in-image ads. Since then, the company has relaunched as a platform geared towards ordinary folk. In addition to being able to make money from your photos, Stipple now adds a useful layer on top of the images, allowing you to share, caption, and track your photos in ways that aren’t possible with static image files.
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Mosaic by Mixbook to Bring Easy-As-Pie Photobook Creation to Mobile Devices

Back in March, a location-based mobile chat startup named Yobongo was acquired by DIY photobook publisher Mixbook. The target of the purchase was the talent of the team, not the app, and over the past half year, the programmers have been stealthily building a new photobook app. Although the launch might still be a little ways off, some details about the project are starting to emerge. Sarah Perez of TechCrunch writes,

With Mosaic, Mixbook hopes to address all these pain points associated with traditional photobooks. They’ve taken care to design an app which lets you build a photo book in a minute or so, instead of hours. To accomplish this, one feature they’ve focused on is the photo picker, Elston says. In some apps, selecting photos is tedious and slow, and you often have to upload items one-by-one. Also, when you take multiple shots of the same thing, it’s hard to tell in the small thumbnail view which is the best. Plus, it tends to be difficult to upload a lot of photos all at once […]

To keep costs down, Mosaic has also limited the output to just one product SKU. There’s no variety of books to choose from, and there aren’t tons of page templates. Well, that sounds like the photo books might be kind of boring, then, I told Elston. Homogenous even. But he hinted that Mosaic is doing something interesting with the covers to keep each one looking unique.

A photobook sent off to be printed within minutes, all from your mobile device. That sounds pretty intriguing.

Now At Mixbook, Former Yobongo Team Reveals Mosaic, A Fast Way To Build Photobooks From Your iPhone [TechCrunch]

EverPix Building Semantic Photo Search for Giant Picture Libraries

As people snap more and more digital photos, being able to organize those photos into useful sets is becoming increasingly important. Facial recognition algorithms are quickly becoming a standard feature in popular photo origination programs (e.g. iPhoto), but people-sorting is only the tip of the “semantic photo search” iceberg. Cloud photo service EverPix is one company that’s currently working to take photo recognition beyond faces. Sarah Perez of TechCrunch writes,

[…] the eventual goal for Everpix is to become the default way people choose to view and share photos. One development which could help it get there is the image analysis technology the company has been developing in-house. As people’s photo collections grow exponentially over the years, it’s something that will become more valuable in time. Using generalized semantic tagging techniques, Everpix is building algorithms that can identify what the photo is of – meaning, whether it’s a person, a night or day shot, a wide or close shot, a city scene, a nature photo, a photo of a baby, or a vehicle, or a photo of food, among many other things.

What’s important here is that the way they’ve built this to scale. After training the system on a minimal amount of photos, Everpix can then look for other photos in a user’s collection that match that signature without reprocessing the entire photo collection.

In the future, we’ll likely be able to search for photos with photos. Looking for a particular photo that you took at a popular tourist landmark? Just show the app a similar photo found online, and voilà, yours appears.

Cloud Photos Service Everpix Exits Beta With New Website & iPad App; Semantic Photo Search Coming Soon [TechCrunch]

I Am CC Allows Instagram Users to Share Under a Creative Commons License

Flickr’s Creative Commons licensing options allows its users to grant licenses that allow creators to make use of the photographs under a set of terms (e.g. attribution, non-commercial). Most photo sharing services have yet to bake Creative Commons licenses into their websites, but starting today, Instagram users can now release their photos under CC — albeit through a third-party solution.

It’s called I Am CC, and is a project started by LocalWiki founder Philip Neustrom that aims to “make the world a better, more creative place.”
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