Posts Tagged ‘service’

Shutterfly Gobbles Up Another Camera Company Photo Sharing Site

Shutterfly is making a habit of gobbling up photo sharing services that camera companies no longer want to run. Less than half a year after acquiring Kodak Gallery from Kodak for a meager $23.8 million, Shutterfly has now taken another photo site off the hands of a company very similar to Kodak: Fujifilm. The Japanese imaging company has agreed to dump its photo sharing and printing business SeeHere into Shutterfly’s lap, shutting down the service on November 8, 2012.
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Stipple Expands Beyond In-Photo Ads to Offer Sharing, Tagging, and Tracking

We first covered Stipple last year, when it was a B2B service that was attempting to turn microstock on its head by offering image licenses in exchange for in-image ads. Since then, the company has relaunched as a platform geared towards ordinary folk. In addition to being able to make money from your photos, Stipple now adds a useful layer on top of the images, allowing you to share, caption, and track your photos in ways that aren’t possible with static image files.
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Mosaic by Mixbook to Bring Easy-As-Pie Photobook Creation to Mobile Devices

Back in March, a location-based mobile chat startup named Yobongo was acquired by DIY photobook publisher Mixbook. The target of the purchase was the talent of the team, not the app, and over the past half year, the programmers have been stealthily building a new photobook app. Although the launch might still be a little ways off, some details about the project are starting to emerge. Sarah Perez of TechCrunch writes,

With Mosaic, Mixbook hopes to address all these pain points associated with traditional photobooks. They’ve taken care to design an app which lets you build a photo book in a minute or so, instead of hours. To accomplish this, one feature they’ve focused on is the photo picker, Elston says. In some apps, selecting photos is tedious and slow, and you often have to upload items one-by-one. Also, when you take multiple shots of the same thing, it’s hard to tell in the small thumbnail view which is the best. Plus, it tends to be difficult to upload a lot of photos all at once […]

To keep costs down, Mosaic has also limited the output to just one product SKU. There’s no variety of books to choose from, and there aren’t tons of page templates. Well, that sounds like the photo books might be kind of boring, then, I told Elston. Homogenous even. But he hinted that Mosaic is doing something interesting with the covers to keep each one looking unique.

A photobook sent off to be printed within minutes, all from your mobile device. That sounds pretty intriguing.

Now At Mixbook, Former Yobongo Team Reveals Mosaic, A Fast Way To Build Photobooks From Your iPhone [TechCrunch]

EverPix Building Semantic Photo Search for Giant Picture Libraries

As people snap more and more digital photos, being able to organize those photos into useful sets is becoming increasingly important. Facial recognition algorithms are quickly becoming a standard feature in popular photo origination programs (e.g. iPhoto), but people-sorting is only the tip of the “semantic photo search” iceberg. Cloud photo service EverPix is one company that’s currently working to take photo recognition beyond faces. Sarah Perez of TechCrunch writes,

[…] the eventual goal for Everpix is to become the default way people choose to view and share photos. One development which could help it get there is the image analysis technology the company has been developing in-house. As people’s photo collections grow exponentially over the years, it’s something that will become more valuable in time. Using generalized semantic tagging techniques, Everpix is building algorithms that can identify what the photo is of – meaning, whether it’s a person, a night or day shot, a wide or close shot, a city scene, a nature photo, a photo of a baby, or a vehicle, or a photo of food, among many other things.

What’s important here is that the way they’ve built this to scale. After training the system on a minimal amount of photos, Everpix can then look for other photos in a user’s collection that match that signature without reprocessing the entire photo collection.

In the future, we’ll likely be able to search for photos with photos. Looking for a particular photo that you took at a popular tourist landmark? Just show the app a similar photo found online, and voilà, yours appears.

Cloud Photos Service Everpix Exits Beta With New Website & iPad App; Semantic Photo Search Coming Soon [TechCrunch]

I Am CC Allows Instagram Users to Share Under a Creative Commons License

Flickr’s Creative Commons licensing options allows its users to grant licenses that allow creators to make use of the photographs under a set of terms (e.g. attribution, non-commercial). Most photo sharing services have yet to bake Creative Commons licenses into their websites, but starting today, Instagram users can now release their photos under CC — albeit through a third-party solution.

It’s called I Am CC, and is a project started by LocalWiki founder Philip Neustrom that aims to “make the world a better, more creative place.”
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Amazon Glacier Lets You Back Up Your Entire Photo Library on the Cheap

The number one reason for data loss is human error, and one of the other major reasons is the failure of storage mediums. When examining ways to store digital photos for a lifetime back in 2009, we noted that entrusting your data to the servers and engineers of major cloud companies (e.g. Amazon and its S3) was a better option than trying to back up your data yourself. Even though Amazon’s S3 has long been an attractive option — after all, many online photo sharing services use it for storing your data — its pricing of around around $0.14/GB/month means that storing just a terabyte costs $100+/month.

That changes today with the introduction of Amazon Glacier. It’s a new uber-low-cost storage service for people who just want a place to dump their data without having to worry about it. Pricing starts at a crazy-low $0.01/GB/month.
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Sony Jumps Into the Photo Sharing Game with PlayMemories Online

Now that online sharing of images and video has become so commonplace, Sony has decided that they too want a piece of the pie. And their new storage service, dubbed PlayMemories Online, is how they intend to claim that piece. Launched only a couple of days ago, the service is now available in the US, UK, France, Germany, Japan and Canada and offers 5GB of storage for free. Read more…

Digg Founder Kevin Rose Interviews Instagram Founder Kevin Systrom

For those of you who are interested in the business and technology side of things, here’s an interesting 45-minute interview in which Digg founder Kevin Rose chats with Instagram founder Kevin Systrom:

They chat about Systrom’s growing up with computers, his time spent at Stanford, and landing an internship at a startup destined to be worth billions. This ultimately led to launching Instagram which is now 15 million users strong and one of the fastest growing social networks on the planet!

(via Laughing Squid)

Candidtag Lets Photogs Earn Cash From Strangers Who Don’t Carry Cameras

Candidtag is a new service designed to make it easy to earn a little cash by photographing strangers you meet out in public. The idea is that there are people (e.g. tourists) out there who are too busy enjoying their lives to carry a camera around, but at the same time would like memories of their experiences. If you always carry your camera around, you can offer to take pictures for strangers and then give them a card pointing them to your Candidtag “collection”. The client can later visit the website to view the photos you took and purchase prints or digital copies. Photographers are paid by commission when sales are made.

Candidtag (Thanks Justin!)

Kodak Trying to Sell Its Photo Sharing Service for “Hundreds of Millions”

Earlier this month, Kodak sold off its sensor business in an effort to raise some cash to stay alive and hopefully turn things around. Now the company is looking to get even leaner by selling off its online photo sharing business. Photo sharing? Kodak? Yup, it’s called Kodak Gallery. While it’s not surprising that the camera maker has online services, what might be surprising is the price they’re looking to sell it for: according to the Wall Street Journal, it’s in the “hundreds of millions of dollars.”

Kodak first jumped into the online photo sharing and printing game in 2001, when it purchased Ofoto for somewhere south of $100 million. The service reportedly amassed 75 million customers worldwide and was bringing in $150 million in annual revenue at its peak. However, it has never been profitable and last month saw only 1.5 million visitors. In addition to the service itself, Kodak is selling off some of its valuable patents related to uploading and sharing photos online.

Kodak Seeks to Sell Online Photo-Sharing Business Kodak Gallery (via Reuters)