Posts Tagged ‘deathoffilm’

The Rise and Decline of Film, As Told from Film’s Perspective

Film has seen better days. With legends like Kodak’s Kodachrome gone, and staples like Fujifilm’s Neopan 400 very recently following suit, most news about film is met with dismay and long drawn out “No’s” (if you doubt it, check out the comment section on the Neopan 400 and Provia 400X discontinuation announcement linked above).

But what exactly does “Film” himself think of this. What would the medium say if we could ask him to relate his feelings on the rise of digital photography? Tyler Shields’ The Death of Film gives us one interpretation of the answers we might get (note: there is a little bit of strong language in a couple of spots). Read more…

Photo Essay: The Final Week of Capitol Hill 60 Minute Photo in Seattle

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Capitol Hill 60 Minute Photo closed its doors at the end of last year. Given the transformation photography has gone through over the past decade, it hardly came as a surprise. At its core, the success, survival, and eventual demise of 60 Minute Photo is just another familiar story of a business fighting against the moving current of technology. It’s closure, however, reveals something important, something personal. It represents a shift in how we create and preserve our memories and a deepening of the divide between customer and proprietor.
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‘Consistent Quality Photographic Film Will Be Impossible to Make’

The Economist has published an article on photographic film’s “transition from the mass market to the artisanal,” writing that the future is bleak for film as we know it:

Consumers and professionals ditched film first. Then health-care services, which used it for X-rays, shifted to digital scans. The final blow came with the film industry’s switch to digital projection. IHS iSuppli [...] estimates filmmakers consumed 2.5m miles [...] of film each year for the distribution of prints at its height. That was just a few years ago. By 2012 this plunged by two-thirds. In 2015 it will be next to nothing.

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Photographs Documenting the Demise of Camera Film Companies

Since 2005, photographer and photography lecturer Robert Burley has been documenting the demise of film photography through film photographs. He has traveled around the world with his 4×5 field camera in tow, capturing the demolition of buildings, the equipment that once powered a giant industry, and the desolation of factories that were once teeming with workers.

The photograph above shows a crowd watching the implosions of buildings 65 and 69 at Kodak Park in Rochester, New York on October 6, 2007.
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University Unloading Its Film Photography Gear At Ridiculous Prices

Clemson University is apparently ditching film photography and going digital. The public South Carolina-based school has just turned to government surplus auctions to unload its analog gear, and the equipment is being snatched up for ridiculously low prices. The lot of 9 “excellent condition” Hasselblad 500 EL/M medium format camera bodies seen above was just sold for $1,200, which comes out to about $133 for each camera (granted, there are some taxes and processing fees tacked on).
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Kodak Pulls the Plug on T-MAX P3200

Kodak may be planning to sell its film division, but for the time being the business is still under the company’s control. The company announced yesterday that T-MAX P3200 is the latest in its lineup to be discontinued, citing the plummeting demand for ultra-high speed black-and-white film.
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Sign of the Times: Fujifilm to Stop Making Film for the Cinema Industry

Less than a month after Kodak announced the sale of its photographic film business, Fujifilm has some downer news of its own: the end of its motion picture film business.
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Kodak to Sell its Camera Film Business

It’s a sad day for film photographers: Kodak has announced that it will sell off its camera film business, one of the huge pillars of what made Kodak Kodak in the eyes of consumers around the world. It’s yet another step in the company’s effort to climb out of bankruptcy, which it hopes to do by next year, and transform itself into a commercial printing company.
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Hollywood Throws Kodak Film a Lifeline, Will Keep Using it for Movies… For Now

Good news for film photography lovers: Kodak film may be okay for at least a few more years. The company has signed new contracts with four major Hollywood movie studios that will allow it to provide film for movies at least through 2015.
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Fujifilm Discontinues a Number of Formats from the Velvia Film Lineup

This year hasn’t been very friendly to Fujifilm’s film lineup. The company has already announced the discontinuation of APS films, the cutting of some less popular films, and a worldwide price increase. The bad news doesn’t end there: the British Journal of Photography is reporting that the company is making major cuts to its popular Velvia brand, a film known for its resolution and color saturation.
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