PetaPixel

Kuddle: Instagram for Kids that Discourages Bullying and Teaches ‘Netiquette’

kuddle

Kuddle isn’t your typical photo sharing app. Designed for children, this “Instagram for kids” doesn’t just offer a safe environment where the youngins can share photos and become future cappuccino photographers, it actually teaches them about proper online behavior, or ‘netiquette’, at the same time.

The more we read about Kuddle, the more we wish adults had something like this too. As we all know, the Internet can be a hateful place, and photo-sharing sites are no exception. Which is why Kuddle’s developers created their app in the first place.

They say if you want to fix a problem, you start with the children, and that’s what Kuddle does. One the surface, it’s simply a photo sharing app where they can take, share and like pictures. But on a deeper level, it’s about making sure that becoming a part of a social network doesn’t turn kids into the beginnings of a troll.

Of course, doing this is no easy feat, even with Kuddle’s own first friend ‘MySpace Tom’, who goes by the name of Kodi Kuddle, leading the charge.

Creating an account requires that you provide the name and email of a parent or guardian that can monitor your activity, all profiles are private (require a friend request to see them), there is no geolocation, likes are anonymous, posting a photo requires that you agree online bullying is bad, and there are no comments at all (although you can caption your photos).

Basically, it’s Instagram without much of the social functionality, and people are LOVING it. According to Reuters, average daily growth of the user base is 10-15 percent. Plus, the company recently raised $2 million in funding and are in the process of raising another $8 million.

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In other words, if you haven’t heard of Kuddle yet, you probably will soon. And don’t be surprised if you start wishing there was a Kuddle option you could enable on adult Instagram…

To find out more about the app, or if you’d like to download a free copy for yourself, head over to the app’s website, the iTunes App Store or Google Play.

(via Fast Company)


 
  • g.s. photo

    How do they get around the federal requirement of kids needing to be 13 before they can create an account online?

  • GPH Visual Artist

    why do kids need smartphones?