PetaPixel

Adobe Attempts to Reach Out to Address Creative Cloud Concerns

creativecloud

There has been no lack of controversy surrounding the announcement of Adobe’s new Creative Cloud product line, and the California-based company is well aware. So much so, in fact, they’ve come out with an update to address some of the major concerns in moving from their traditional boxed-copy to subscription-based model.

Those concerns include the inability to recover files in the event a customer’s subscription expires or lapses, the fact that photography enthusiasts may be looking for a more tailored offering (as opposed to an entire suite of products they’re paying for but will never actually use), and the basic fact that some individuals just may not be ready to move to subscription services, plain and simple.

creative-cloud-mosaicOn the matter of file recovery in the event of subscription lapse, Adobe “completely agrees that customers should have access to their files if they choose to stop their Creative Cloud membership.” The company says they’re looking at a number of options on this front and expect to report back in the near future.

For the photography enthusiast, Adobe is considering “potential offerings that recognize the photography community – because it is so broad – has some unique needs.” So, nothing really concrete on that front, either.

For the folks who simply aren’t sure they want to move to a subscription model, Adobe is adamant that Creative Cloud is the way of the future:

“We continue to believe that the move to Creative Cloud will benefit the wider creative community because of the constant stream of innovation that we’re able to deliver.”

Even though the company hasn’t really directly addressed the concerns mentioned above, they do still offer users who are refusing to move to Creative Cloud the option to purchase Adobe CS6, which will be the last of the Creative Suite line of products. We’ll have more on this as news from Adobe becomes available.

Our Move to Creative Cloud: An Update [Adobe]


Image credit: Cool to see the work @emilychang and I have done on Creative Cloud on the Adobe MAX stage :) by Max Kiesler


 
  • Jason

    Hello mate, Antonio was replying to KJ.

  • Oskar

    there is no such thing as 50usd/month because it requires an year commitment. So the real price is 600usd/year.

  • Ian Jackson

    oh ok haha sorry

  • Ian Jackson

    Sorry antonio thought you were talking to me!

  • http://www.intensitystudios.com/ Antonio Carrasco

    Agree 100%. Just be careful when updating your OS or adding new hardware to your system. The new stuff may cause CS6 to no longer be compatible.

  • Olaf2

    This CC model makes me scared to purchase LR 5. So I am holding back.
    I have no intention to waste work in tens of thousands of pictures I take per year only to discover that LR 6 has become a subscription.

    I prefer to invest money on a the competition that guarantees me that in 5-6 years I can still port my images without ransom software.

    I have 45,000 images in my library in a LR format that I can tweak when I want to make them even better. I do go back and forth of 6 years photographing all the time.

    I don’t care about the price, I care about the fact that I as an artist give away my artistic soul to a commercial company that can choose what they want to do with it how they want.

  • Olaf2

    When this CC fails, then Adobe will have no other option than to increase the price to keep it running. The running costs of a cloud system is many times higher than a standalone version. It also requires higher paid developers to keep it stable and a bug fix not locking out thousands of customers.

    Adobe is already failing to keep their cloud sync up and running. And they only have a small CC subscribers so far.

  • Olaf2

    And on top of that.
    A CC file can only be opened by an CC application. So you are forcing your customers into a CC.

    But a CS6 can always opened to a CC application. So it is better in the interest of a company to stay with CS6 for the next 3-4 years.

  • Matt Rickman

    who is guaranteeing that “in 5-6 years I can still port my images without ransom software.”

    Lightroom doesn’t store your images.

  • Olaf2

    What happens when Adobe gets broke in a couple of years because the CC failed?

    Or worse, what happens if you are in a country that risks being shut down from the cloud because of some boy cot? If I live in Iran, then I would not subscribe to that CC model.

  • Matt Rickman

    Your electricity is a subscription based service as well.

    If you don’t pay your power bill. They shut it off. Then you lose access to your client files.

    I suppose you are currently researching ways to generate your own power.

  • Olaf2

    You don’t have to wait for 18 months to release an update that people can purchase. A single release every 18 months is actually cheaper than 4 updates per year because it is way much harder to keep the release pressure that high. It turns developer in burn outs. Every single release creates a situation that the CC subscription turns hundreds thousands of users into a dead application cause by one tiny bug that went unnoticed.

    The introduction price of $50 is only first this first year. There is no doubt that they will have to increase that price because development costs, supports cost and the CC infrastructure is going to spiral out of control.

  • Matt Rickman

    might want to consider .tif’s and .eps’s then.

    or just keep using cs.

    i’m pretty sure I get it. “THE SKY IS FALLING”

  • Olaf2

    It does store the settings I fine tuned without requiring me to have all files duplicated. In 5-6 years I ill have 100,000 files stored on my computer that I fine tuned over the course of 10 years.

    I could flatten the files but then I lose 10 years of work.

  • Bababonga

    All that non fitting arguments & comparisons…

    What you describe is exactly, what I´m against:

    Electricity I pay by usage.

    I don´t want software to be payed also.

    I exactly don´t want that change.

    With the classical distribution I can use my files as long as I want (would be great if that´s possible with electricity, too – and that´s why your comparison doesn´t fit).

    With CashCow (CC) I have to pay for every file I open from my archive (It isn´t possible to use electricity, you already used, again).

  • KJ

    Keeping up with client’s file formats is an excellent reason why you should do CC. You’re making it harder for the client to deal with you. No?

  • KJ

    Apples and oranges bro. You speak of a design premium upgrade, but you’re getting Master Collection + more with CC. You pay more for added value. You get more, so make hay with the new apps.

  • KJ

    Yeah, but you’re failing your clients by delivering a file type around a decade behind the times? My clients have no tolerance to open a file that requires a cocoa based OS and an ancient Mac. Get with the times!

  • KJ

    Open a trial version if you cannot charge back a client then. It is a rare case that I open a file years later, not to mention making changes to it.

  • KJ

    You have that precisely backwards, Olaf.

  • KJ

    So, you can see the future? Very impressive, if true, but I doubt it.

  • KJ

    Open the file and make your change in a trial version if you can’t charge it back to the client and need to make changes to an ancient file type.

  • KJ

    So, no need to keep the prices low to keep you on board and to attract new clients? Glad you can foretell the future. I can’t.

  • KJ

    You can foretell the future, Olaf? I think you’re getting ahead of yourself.

  • KJ

    You have never heard of Sarbanes-Oxley then? If you worked in software you’d understand why companies are trying to find ways to get around the law. Subscription is one way that is win-win. Apple skirts the law by not declaring revenue, so don’t go down that road.

  • KJ

    About as useless as an opinion.

  • KJ

    They need to make $$, so do I. Sorry you don’t you have no faith that this move might actually benefit you.

  • Rob Elliott

    What added value? The Master Collection upgrade fee is $600 every 2 years. it is now double that. Where is the added value? You pay double so you can get new features now? maybe?

    And for the Photographer with the Single App CC it’s 2.4x the price with no reason to assume any added value. Many Photographers skip whole versions because their isn’t enough added value to justify $199 for them. So if Photographers find that if you have CS4 the $199 for CS5 is too much because there isn’t enough added value so they wait and upgrade to CS6. That is $199 over 4 years. ($50 a year opposed to $240 a year) Even if you upgrade every time it’s $240 a year with CC and $100 a year the old way.

    The whole point is that Photographers are saying there isn’t enough added value to make this sub model worth it.

  • Courtney Navey

    KJ you obviously have a bend over and take it relationship with Adobe so let’s just agree to disagree. My clients are more than happy and don’t have any trouble with my files…ever.

  • Bababonga

    I don´t know what kind of professional work you are doing. I have nearly not one day in my business, where I don´t have to open & edit a file between 1 and 3 years old (sometimes much older). May be a client wants to use a part of it´s last year catalogue or a fair trailer needs a new text layer…

    And most of my professional colleagues and business partners see it the same way. In case of Adobes CashCow it means for me: Paying a min of 3 three years, only for the use of my archive.
    And: It doesn´t matter if I can charge that bill to my clients. The problem is, that THERE IS A BILL for that.
    ———-
    CC = Cash Cow = Terminating the word “Archive” in digital future = Lifelong dependency = NoGo = Never

  • Bababonga

    No. No Need. They know: If they want to come out of CashCow (CC) they will lose full, editable access to their files after subscription. After a couple of years, that can become a real catastrophe for professionals.

  • Bababonga

    I don´t know what kind of professional work you are doing. I have nearly not one day in my business, where I don´t have to open & edit a file between 1 and 3 years old (sometimes much older). May be a client wants to use a part of it´s last year catalogue or a fair trailer needs a new text layer…

    And most of my professional colleagues and business partners see it the same way. In case of Adobes CashCow it means for me: Paying a min of 3 three years, only for the use of my archive.

    (Beside the hazel of downloading the complete software, pay, verify, uninstall, book holding,… to open a single file I once created myself )

    You can use the trial version only once.
    And: It doesn´t matter if I can charge that bill to my clients. The problem is, that THERE IS A BILL for that.

    ———-

    CC = Cash Cow = Terminating the word “Archive” in digital future = Lifelong dependency = NoGo = Never

  • Bababonga

    Converting ten thousands of files into (mostly useless) “read only” or “not fully editable” formats after a couple of years in the CashCow? You are invited.
    Sounds not very professional….

  • Bababonga

    Means in case of CashCow: …get FORCED to get with the times.

  • Bababonga

    Get everything you don´t need with the apps you need.
    What an argument!?
    Get 5 cars for the price of one makes only sense if I can sell 4!

  • Bababonga

    There are companies outside, who will give that away for nothing or nearly nothing. And also: It only makes sense if you NEED that. I would never make Adobe my File-Server.

  • Bababonga

    The discussion is exactly about, that Adobe forces us to the CashCow with that.

  • Bababonga

    ABSOLUTELY nothing.
    Only Marketing bushwah half-truth statements again and again and again…

  • Olaf2

    Just look at the history how big company goes tumbling down because they got too greedy and stopped caring about their customer. Look at the big companies, IBM, Dell, Compaq, Yahoo, Myspace, Borland….

  • Olaf2

    I cannot see the future, but have a lot of experience in the IT and developers world and this is a decision that is going to hurt Adobe really big.

    It is a by myth that big industries want to have the latest and expensiveness technologies. This is never the case. Most big companies rely on saving as much as possible and even use very outdated software. Windows XP, Internet explorer, CS3 is not uncommon. Especially now with the crisis still running.

  • Olaf2

    It is funny, you only defence is that we cannot tell the future.

    You are willing to give up your artistic sole under the control of a big commercial company that only wants to get more money and control just to save a few bucks?
    The only reason why you would want to subscribe to the CC model is to have these flashy new tools to impress your fellow students with you latest update you got first. CC is the equivalent of Facebook with apps like Farmvill…
    This CC also opened the door for daily adds from Adobe. Expect your CC apps splash screen to contain adds about dating sites and rubbish movie trailers in a couple of years from now

  • Courtney Navey

    Olaf2 just ignore KJ. He obviously is one of those kids that was beat up a lot and uses the comments sections in blogs to talk nonsensical trash to anyone who isn’t giving Adobe head.

  • JD

    Courtney don’t worry Microsoft thought they could keep their heads in the clouds also, but ended up re assuring the majority of their customers that their new op systems would be available for desktops, Adobe will have to do the same they will lose a lot of customers that only use three or four of their apps in the CS6 suite, I believe most people will just stick with CS6 as most of the features from adobe are not a big improvement and any filters that adobe creates a private vendor will do the same for CS6. Eventually Adobe will get their heads out of the clouds and re join the winning team like most greedy company’s do and we will see the software suites offered in the box again.
    Most people are not comfortable giving out their credit cards and paying interest on something like this, that is unless you have nothing else to blow your money on.