PetaPixel

Smartphone Thermal Imaging Attachment Becomes a Reality

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A few months ago, we told you about a neat, open-source attachment created by modder Andy Rawson that could instantly turn your smartphone into a thermal imaging camera. At the time, Rawson was intending to sell the production models for $150 and otherwise open source the project for the DIYers out there. Well, add about $25 to the price tag and a ridiculously successful Kickstarter campaign and you’ve got the IR-Blue.

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As with the original version, the IR-Blue uses a 64 zone non-contact InfraRed sensor array to sense the temperature of whatever you’re pointing your phone at. Unlike the original, this version did away with the dock connection in favor of Bluetooth.

Both the iPhone and Android apps will be a free download, and then you’ve got a few options. You can pledge $12 and get a plain, printed IR-Blue circuit board — hardcore DIYers only. You can pledge $145 and get all of the parts you’ll need to build your own — beginner and intermediate DIYers who own a soldering iron are welcome. Or you can pledge $175 and get a fully put together and tested IR-Blue,

Here’s what the system looks like for iPhone and Android:

There’s no need to worry about the possibility that the IR-Blue won’t come to fruition — Rawson’s campaign has already hit $105K, more than quintupling his original $20K goal — but if he hits $150K in the next 15 days, the IR-Blue will come equipped with dual-mode Bluetooth 2.0 and 4.0 built right in.

To add your pledge to the pot or turn your smartphone into a thermal camera for cheap (the suggested retail price is $195), head over to Kickstarter and check out the IR-Blue for yourself.


 
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  • http://www.facebook.com/tiago.als Tiago Santos

    do we really need this? :S

  • http://twitter.com/IEBAcom Anthony Burokas

    Want. I already know I have cold spots in the house. Nailing them down and the source of the cold air would probably pay this off in one winter.