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Photographer Captures the Beauty of Latvia in Infrared Photos

During the summer of 2021, I was invited by a close friend living in Latvia to visit the country for a few days. Totally foreign to the Baltic countries, I was able to discover Latvia through different aspects, from its capital Riga to national parks and forests, passing by a memorial of the Second World War.

Infrared Photos of France, From Iconic Places to Hidden Gems

For the last years, I have spent every summer traveling across France to discover the diversity of its landscapes and its natural heritage. Usually, summer is synonymous with crowds of vacationers and tourists. For this project, summer is also synonymous with lush nature, in which infrared photography works the best to reveal alternative colors.

Using an Infrared Flash for Stealthy Street Photography

Street photography is one of the most appreciated genres in photography. By showing daily life in a new way, it can speak to everyone. That explains why some of the most famous photographers are street photographers: Henri Cartier-Bresson, Vivian Maier, Martin Parr, Diane Arbus, or Joel Meyerowitz. They created iconic pictures by finding the right moment to catch the interesting details that no one else could have seen.

Using Infrared to Reinvent Local Scenes

This year, as photographers, we've been challenged to look at more ordinary subjects closer to home in pursuit of continuing our photography. 2020 has pushed us to find creative potential in the more everyday and mundane, perhaps duping us in the process that these subjects are in fact worthy of our attention.

Capturing the Loire Valley’s Fairy Tale Castles with an Infrared Drop-In Filter

My name is Pierre-Louis Ferrer, and I am a professional French photographer specialized in infrared and ultraviolet photography for ten years now. I spend a large part of my free time experiencing and testing new filters and equipment to see behind the visible. My work is mostly divided between artistic photography, dermatologic photography for cosmetic brands, and infrared photography workshops in Paris.

This Lens Filter Faithfully Recreates the Look of Kodak Aerochrome IR Film

Kodak Aerochrome was a popular infrared film that produced a distinctive look photographers have utilized for various projects. Discontinued a decade ago, a 24-exposure roll of Aerochrome can cost over $80 these days. If you want the look of Aerochrome without the cost, the new IR Chrome lens filter for digital cameras was designed just for you.

Why Infrared Images Look the Way They Do

Infrared photos and videos have an instantly recognizable look to them that you're probably familiar with. But do you know the reasons things look the way they do? Here's an interesting 4-minute video that explores the subject through infrared views of the "invisible" side of London.

I Visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone with an Infrared Camera

A few years ago, I visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone with an infrared camera. We always hear praises of the might of Mother Nature, how it renders useless mans’ creations and bears life above the ruins. Well, it’s something that is always felt, but never on such a huge scale. This place IS the place for these contrasts.

How to Try Out Infrared Photography Without Modifying Your Camera

Digital cameras usually have infrared filters on the sensor that work to block out almost all of the infrared information reaching it. To shoot infrared photos, photographers often have their camera converted to capture infrared light by removing this filter, but in turn the camera loses its ability to capture "normal" images. If you'd like to dabble with IR photography, there's an easier alternative.

An Introduction to Digital Infrared Photography

The human eye is incapable of seeing infrared light, so infrared photography is truly a way to show your audience something they can never see with their own eyes. Here's a guide to getting started with digital infrared photography.

These Infrared Photos of Washington, D.C. Show the Capital in a New Light

Washington DC is one of the most photographed places in the United States, with over 20 million tourists passing through in 2014.

With so many cameras being pointed everywhere in the capital, photographer Mark Andre wanted to offer a different take. So, he converted a standard DSLR into an infrared camera and has spent the past year shooting an otherworldly series of photos of DC.

Infrared Sports Photographer Walks You Through His IR Photography Workflow

As great as infrared photography can be, for most of us, it’s an enigma that is often difficult to nail down since we’re capturing that which we can’t see with our eyes. However, just because we can’t actually see it, doesn’t mean we can’t teach our brain to visualize what the outcome will be when we snap the shutter.

Here to help us learn how to ‘see’ infrared light is Danish photographer Esben Olesen, who takes a few minutes to walk us through his basic infrared workflow when shooting with his converted DSLR.