Posts Published in July 2012

Photos Documenting the Illegal Use of Olympic Branding

The 2012 London Olympics is pretty strict about how the Games’ branding is used, prohibiting the unauthorized use of everything from the Olympic symbol to the word “Olympic”. Enforcing the rules is another story, as businesses both near and far use Olympic branding extensively to promote their own interests. Photographer Craig Atkinson recently decided to start a project documenting illegal uses in London through a photo project titled Illegal Olympics.
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Hilarious Sketch Shows Anne Geddes as a Not-So-Sweet Baby Photographer

Some fashion photographers are known for hyper-conceited attitudes and nasty personalities — traits that aren’t usually shared by infant photographers. What if they were? This humorous sketch by Paulilu Mixtape is titled “Anne Geddes: Beneath the Diaper”, and offers a behind-the-scenes look at famous baby photographer Anne Geddes in action.

Photographing Extreme Skiing in the Alps

Here’s a beautiful behind-the-scenes video that takes us on an adventure with Magnum photographer Jonas Bendiksen as he shoots extreme skiing at the foot of Mont Blanc. Bendiksen was testing the Leica S2 medium-format DSLR — typically thought of as a studio camera — to see how it stands up in harsh outdoor environments.
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A Nifty Panoramic Pinhole Camera Made with LEGO Blocks

We’ve featured large format LEGO cameras before, but what about wide format? Photographer Giacomo Citti created this panoramic LEGO pinhole camera that features a sliding shutter and film winders on the sides.
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Bizarre Portraits of People Poking Their Heads Underwater

Fish Heads is a strange series of portraits by Los Angeles-based photographer Tim Tadder featuring subjects plunging their faces under the surface of water with wild expressions on their faces. The final photos are rotating, giving viewers a disorienting perspective.
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Turn a Monorail View Camera Digital by Attaching a DSLR

Digital view cameras can be quite pricey, but if you have an old analog view camera and a DSLR sitting around, you can combine the two cameras to make a DIY frankencam. Northlight Images has a tutorial for doing this with Canon DSLRs, and Nikon Rumors has a tutorial for Nikon shooters (either tutorial should work for you regardless of which brand you use). The resulting rig allows you to take advantage of the tilt and shift features of view cameras.

London Olympic Photographs from Over 100 Years Ago

The Olympic games in London this year makes London the first city to have hosted the modern Olympic Games three times. The previous times were in 1908 and 1948. Here are some photographs captured at the 1908 Olympics 104 years ago, during a time when megaphones were used to announce events, top hats were all the rage, and dresses were worn by female competitors (this was the third games in which women were allowed to compete).
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Instagram Filters for Photoshop, Aperture, and Lightroom

Instagram Photoshop Aperture Lightroom

Photographer Casey McCallister reverse engineered Instagram’s filters, turning them into actions and presets for Photoshop, Aperture, and Lightroom that allow you to retro-fy your photos with one click. The download packs include all 17 Instagram filters and are “latte-priced” at $5.

Photoshop, Aperture, and Lightroom Presets [Casey Mac Photo]

Canon’s Drool-Worthy Gear Room at the London Olympics

Canon Olympics Camera Gear Room

Welcome to camera gear heaven: here’s a glimpse inside the Canon Professional Services office at the London 2012 Olympics. It’s a room that’s absolutely stuffed with cameras, lenses, and accessories from floor to ceiling. The Canon 1D X hasn’t been released to the general public yet, but this room has hundreds of them!
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Make a DIY Rain Cover for Your DSLR Using a Ziploc Bag

If you need to do a quick shoot in the rain but don’t have a proper rain cover handy, you can quickly put together a makeshift one using a large Ziploc freezer bag. Photographer Kariann Goodkey over at Purple Summit Photography has a step-by-step tutorial on the conversion, which basically involves cutting out a whole and using gaffer tape to secure your lens hood to the “cover”. Goodkey writes,

If you are going to be out in the rain a long time you might want to get a proper cover to protect your investment though! That said I used this in over 6 hours of continuous rain sitting in the bush photographing a horse ride and my camera kept dry. After about three hours with this set up I did start to get condensation on the inside of the bag. This limited my view quite a bit through the viewfinder but I could still photograph and my camera was fine. For a quick shoot in the rain though this will work great.

DIY Camera rain cover [Purple Summit Photography]