PetaPixel

Photos of the New Samsung Pseudo-DSLR System

Samsung is releasing a new hybrid digital camera system sometime in early January of next year called the NX Series. The idea is that the new series would combine the advantages of DSLR and point-and-shoot cameras. Before we go into some details, here are a couple photographs of the actual camera that were posted to dpreview’s forums.

The camera has the form of a DSLR, but uses an electronic viewfinder, allowing them to remove the traditional mirror system in DSLRs to make the camera smaller and lighter (and probably virtually silent). Though it has the portability of point-and-shoot cameras, it still offers a DSLR-style sensor for higher quality images, and an interchangeable lens system.

The decreased distance between the lens and sensor allows the system to use lens designs that traditional SLR/DSLR cameras could not support (similar to the crop sensor lenses of Canon/Nikon). Here are a couple photographs of the 30mm f/2.0 “pancake” lens that were posted to the k-rumors forums.

If that’s not a “compact” lens, I don’t know what is.

Though DSLR enthusiasts might not be too enthusiastic about the electronic viewfinder, the portability is something that will likely be a hit among people who would like to do DSLR style photography but don’t want to lug around bulky equipment. The company estimates that the hybrid digital camera market will have a 20% market share by 2012.

What are your thoughts regarding the NX Series?

(via Photo Rumors)


Image credits: Camera body images from dpreview, lens images from k-rumors.


 
  • Meekohi

    An excellent idea in my opinion. Average users want a digital viewfinder and it greatly simplifies the traditional SLR design.

  • Meekohi

    An excellent idea in my opinion. Average users want a digital viewfinder and it greatly simplifies the traditional SLR design.

  • http://twitter.com/_jmphotography Jay McIntyre

    I for one love pancakes!!! but I'm not sure I'd be sold on this. Pretty neat though.

  • http://jasoncollinphotography.com/ Jason Collin Photography

    Can't imagine using a digital viewfinder when shooting sports or anything I'm shooting with a medium telephoto lens on.

    Pancake lens concept is pretty cool.

    However, since I am not weak I like large, bulky gear, feels solid and instills confidence in me that I'm using something substantial.

  • http://twitter.com/dixonmarshall Dixon Marshall

    Whether I like it or not totally depends upon the image quality. If it truly has equivalent IQ to my Canon 40D, then I think it's great. Usually, cameras like this just can't compete with a traditional DSLR on high ISO, and the ability to shoot in low light is important to me.

  • http://twitter.com/miahz Jeremiah Zabal

    Odd that there's no images of the back of the camera, when the viewfinder seems to be the whole point of this camera.

    I think an electronic viewfinder is sort of a step backward when modern DSLRs and interchangeable-lens cameras like Olympus' PEN line already have live preview LCDs that don't require the camera to be attached to your eye.

  • eeed

    it's a great idea, kinda turns the whole DSLR world on it's head and that's a good thing. we're in the digital age now, no reason to have the same restrictions as film. of course those coming from film will have a hard time and i think that's the true hurdle for this design. KUDOS for taking the risk

  • http://shuttersounds.thedailynathan.com nathanyan

    What do you mean by a “camera like this”. The NX system will use a larger sensor than the 40D will – given equivalent sensor technologies (though you can't assume this), you would expect the NX to produce better quality.

  • http://shuttersounds.thedailynathan.com nathanyan

    It'll support both – live preview via the rear LCD, and an electronic viewfinder (a smaller LCD where the optical viewfinder usually is)

  • http://www.photoblog.com/bergur Bergur

    Impressive. And I suppose many will fall for this little charming thing – though I still want my bulky equipment.

  • http://www.photoblog.com/bergur Bergur

    Impressive. And I suppose many will fall for this little charming thing – though I still want my bulky equipment.

  • http://twitter.com/dixonmarshall Dixon Marshall

    After some searching, it would seem as if this camera uses an APS-C sensor–same as my 40D.

    But, from personal experience, and from the reviews I have read, it would seem that moving away from Canon or Nikon means putting up with poor low-light performance, or relatively high noise.

  • http://twitter.com/dixonmarshall Dixon Marshall

    After some searching, it would seem as if this camera uses an APS-C sensor–same as my 40D.

    But, from personal experience, and from the reviews I have read, it would seem that moving away from Canon or Nikon means putting up with poor low-light performance, or relatively high noise.

  • wildeel

    I don't get the fuss … Panasonic and Olympus have had similar cameras on the market for some time now Or don't they count in this Nikon/Canon biased world?

  • http://shuttersounds.thedailynathan.com nathanyan

    APS-C isn't actually a definite sensor size – you'll notice that both Nikon and Canon cameras use an “APS-C” size sensor for cameras like the 7D or D40, but the D40's 1.5x APS-C sensor is actually larger than the 7D's 1.6x APS-C sensor.

    This Samsung system uses a 1.5x sensor, so it is bigger, albeit slightly.

    Canon and Nikon cameras tend to have above-average high-ISO performance, but as a consumer you should *never* make blanket judgements along the lines of “Canon has a good reputation, their high-ISO should always be better than Camera brand X”.

  • http://shuttersounds.thedailynathan.com nathanyan

    APS-C isn't actually a definite sensor size – you'll notice that both Nikon and Canon cameras use an “APS-C” size sensor for cameras like the 7D or D40, but the D40's 1.5x APS-C sensor is actually larger than the 7D's 1.6x APS-C sensor.

    This Samsung system uses a 1.5x sensor, so it is bigger, albeit slightly.

    Canon and Nikon cameras tend to have above-average high-ISO performance, but as a consumer you should *never* make blanket judgements along the lines of “Canon has a good reputation, their high-ISO should always be better than Camera brand X”.