highiso

Nikon D5 vs Sony a7R II… at ISO 3,276,800

The $6,500 Nikon D5 DSLR and $3,200 Sony a7R II mirrorless camera are two of the current leaders in low-light, high-ISO shooting, but how do they stack up against each other? This 1.5-minute comparison video will show you.

This is Nikon D5 Image Quality at ISO 3,280,000

One of the exciting features of the new flagship Nikon D5 is the fact that it can shoot with a native ISO of up to 102,400 and an expanded ISO of 3,280,000. If you're curious about what the D5's ISO 3.28 million looks like in photos, we've got some images that'll give you a small glimpse at the quality.

Here’s How the Sony a7S II Compares to the Human Eye in Low Light

The Sony a7S II is known to have amazing performance in low light and at high ISO. To see just how powerful its low light capabilities are, a Greek photographer who goes by Boji decided to do a casual test that pits the camera against the human eye. You can see the comparison in the 48-second video above.

This is ISO 4,560,000 with Canon’s Crazy New Camera

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Back in July, Canon announced an ultra-high-sensitivity camera that has a ridiculously high max ISO of over 4,000,000. If you've been wondering what the camera can capture, check out the eye-opening sample video above that Canon just released.

This is How Good the Sony a7S is with Low Light and High ISO

The highly-regarded Sony a7S is known to be a monster in low-light situations, a fact demonstrated by a number of short films have used moonlight as the only light source. Those projects are eye-opening, but another way to see just how good the camera's high ISO quality is is to compare it with other well-known cameras.

That's what photographer Tony Northrup does in the short 1-minute comparison above, pitting the a7S against the Nikon D810 and Sony a7 II at various ISOs.

What Photographers are NOT Considering When Using High ISO

It’s no secret now that modern cameras have taken photographers to new heights with their ability to shoot at and above ISO 1600. Personally, I can now shoot in situations where previously, I ‘had no choice’ but to use flash or put the camera down, so it’s no surprise many photographers are taking advantage of high ISO to be able to shoot in poor existing light.

The key word here is ‘poor’, so I’ll elaborate. The rule of light is that when a light source is large and close, it is at its softest, but when a subject becomes further away from a light source, the quality of that light deteriorates at a fast pace. So much that it gets to a point where the light ends up looking muddy and horrible, because the contrast ratio of light on the subject compared to the background is almost non-existent.

Sony’s A7s Takes on Canon’s 5D Mark III in Side-by-Side Low-Light Test

So far, all of the Sony A7s high-ISO tests we've seen -- from your standard static test to some beautiful production-level footage -- have only shown the A7s. There have been no side-by-side comparisons to show if this really is outperforming the competition substantially, or if it only seems like it is.

Well, today that changes thanks to a short, Canon 5D Mark III vs. Sony A7s side-by-side comparison created by Den Lennie.

Sony’s A7s Put Through a Production Level Low Light Test, Continues to Impress

We’ve shown you the incredible low-light capabilities of Sony’s 4K-capable A7s camera before. But for the most part, the previously-released tests were fairly static and didn't offer much in way of production-level footage.

EOS HD's Yosh Enatsu took note of this fact, and decided to put together an impressive production-level comparison to show you just how well this mirrorless beast can handle the dark.

Canon Unveils a 35mm Full Frame Sensor for Video That Can See in the Dark

Frustrated with how your camera's CMOS sensor performs in dimly-lit situations? Canon has just announced a new CMOS sensor that'll put a smile on your face. It's a new 35mm full-frame sensor that's designed specifically for capturing video in "exceptionally low-light environments." Canon claims the sensor can capture high quality video with high-sensitivity while keeping noise very low.

Here's how sensitive the new sensor is: it will reportedly be able to see meteor shows, rooms lit with incense sticks, and scenes lit only by moonlight.

Canon 6D and 5DMk3 Noise Comparison for High-ISO Long Exposures

Astrophotography enthusiast Don Marcotte wanted to find out whether the Canon 6D or Canon 5D Mark III was more suitable for his area of photography, so he pitted the two cameras against one another in a few noise tests at his local camera store. He simply shot long exposures without any light (the cap was on) in order to see how much noise would show up in the frame.

A First Look at the Image Quality of the New Leica M at High ISOs

Leica's new flagship digital rangefinder, the Leica M, was announced more than a month ago, but things have been very quiet in regards to sample photos demonstrating the camera's capabilities. If you've been dying see actual photos shot using the camera, today's your lucky day. Pandachief over at the forum HK LFC has published quite a few sample photographs shot in a low-light environment (it appears to be a dinner party).

Kodak Pulls the Plug on T-MAX P3200

Kodak may be planning to sell its film division, but for the time being the business is still under the company's control. The company announced yesterday that T-MAX P3200 is the latest in its lineup to be discontinued, citing the plummeting demand for ultra-high speed black-and-white film.

Nokia Photo Challenge Shows Off the Low-Light Ability of PureView Cameras

Nokia has endured a torrent of bad press over the past couple days over its faked promo video, but the truth is, the company is investing heavily in improving photography in its mobile phones, and its PureView technology is definitely something we should be keeping our eyes on.

In order to back up its claim that PureView low light performance is "unbeatable", Nokia set up a "photo challenge" booth at its launch party and invited passers-by to pit their cameraphones against the Lumia 920. The challenge involved shooting a photograph of a still life setup stuffed inside a dark cubby hole in a brick wall. Check out the video above for a glimpse of how the phone's camera stacked up against the iPhone's and the Samsung Galaxy's.