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Here’s the First 8K Timelapse Shot with the Nikon D850

The new Nikon D850 lets you create 8K timelapses using the 45.7-megapixel sensor and the built-in Interval Timer. If you've been wanting to see what 8K shot with the camera looks like, today's your lucky day: we got our hands on the first 8K timelapse short film shot on the D850.

This Eclipse Photo Shows the Power of Shooting RAW

Here's an eye-opening example that shows the power of shooting RAW. Photographer Dan Plucinski captured a beautiful photo of the solar eclipse yesterday, and this is the before-and-after comparison showing the straight-out-of-camera image (on left) compared to the edited one (on right).

This Dramatic Shot Was Done with a 2000mm Lens

Here's a neat example of an ultra-telephoto lens being used to add a dramatic effect to a scene. For this scene from the 2011 film Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, director of photography Hoyte van Hoytema used a 2000mm lens to compress the foreground and background so that they look much closer than they really are.

These Short Films Were Shot with the Nikon D5

Want to see what the Nikon D5 can do on the video front? Nikon ambassador photographer Corey Rich shot this short film titled "Inspired" using the new flagship DSLR. The video "explores what drives today’s most diverse and interesting professional photographers and filmmakers, and captures the commitment it takes to tell truly meaningful stories."

An Impressive Test of Adobe’s New Dehaze Slider

Want to see an impressive example of what the new Dehaze slider in Photoshop and Lightroom can do? Check out the 1-minute video above by photographer Grant Friedman, who tested out the feature using a foggy and blown out RAW photo of Times Square on a rainy day.

Check Out the Nikon P900’s Ridiculous 83x Zoom

Earlier this month, we shared a video showing the incredible reach of the Canon SX60, a superzoom compact camera with a 65x lens. If you thought that video was crazy, check out this one featuring the new Nikon P900, which packs an even longer 83x optical zoom lens -- the equivalent of a 24-2000mm lens in 35mm terms.

See How Proper Lighting Can Level the Playing Field Between Sensor Sizes

Karl Taylor has shared a new video highlighting just how important and impactful proper lighting can be no matter what camera you choose to use. In the anecdotal video, shown above, he pits a Canon 5D Mark III against an Olympus OM-D E-M10 in the studio to show you just how similar the results are when the lighting, not the camera, is the focus of the image.

RAW vs JPEG: Using Real-World Examples to Illustrate the Difference

It’s not news that RAW files have a far greater latitude than the same JPEG photographs. However, many beginners only understand this difference on a theoretical level.

In the video above, photography educator Tony Northrup goes beyond theory, detailing the differences and actually showing us how much more leniency RAW files allow for in post-production.

Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Update: We've removed this image to avoid fringing on the copyright held by Magnum Photos. Click the image below to see the original side-by-side comparison.

Still think Adobe's Image Deblurring technology is fake? Check out this before-and-after comparison showing what the feature does to one of the most famous camera-shake photos in history: Robert Capa's D-Day photograph of an American soldier landing on Omaha Beach.

Example Showing the Benefit of RAW’s Higher Dynamic Range

One of huge benefits of shooting in RAW is that RAW files usually have considerably more dynamic range than a JPG. This means that details in the shadows and highlights of an image that would otherwise be lost if shooting JPG are stored in the RAW file, and able to be recovered if needed during post-processing.

Saving JPEG Photos Hundreds of Times

Most of you probably know that JPEG is lossy compression method, meaning compression permanently throws out data and detail. Luckily, a typical compression can save 10 times the space of an uncompressed image without sacrificing much noticeable quality. However, if the image is repeatedly compressed and saved, artifacts introduced during compression become more and more obvious.