cinemagraphs

Moving Portraits of Hollywood Celebrities at the Sundance Film Festival

Photographer Victoria Will received both attention and praise last year for her gorgeous tintype photos of Hollywood celebrities at the Sundance Film Festival.

This year, Will returned to the festival on assignment for Esquire magazine, but instead of tintypes, Will was tasked with creating animated GIF portraits with a dash of movement -- commonly referred to as cinemagraphs.

These Are the First Virtual Reality Cinemagraphs

Back in 2011, photographers Kevin Burg and Jamie Beck helped coin and popularize the "cinemagraph," an animated GIF showing a mostly static photo with certain elements moving and looping.

Now, as the world of virtual reality is starting to take off in a big way, photographer Eran Amir is taking the cinemagraph to a new dimension: 3D. He has created a series of virtual reality cinemagraphs, which you can watch in the 2.5-minute video above.

Creating Wedding Cinemagraphs with Photographer Lindsay Adler

New York-based photographer and instructor Lindsay Adler recently collaborated with cinemagraph software maker Flixel to create a set of three stylized wedding portraits to show off at the upcoming WPPI conference. The behind-the-scenes video above offers a quick introduction to the project.

Glimpses of People and Places in Monrovia, Captured Through Cinemagraphs

Monrovia is the capital of Liberia, the West African country that was founded by the United States and settled in the 1800s by mostly freed slaves (hence its name, which means "land of freedom").

When French photographer Francois Beaurain visited the city in early 2014, he spent five months wandering the streets and documenting this land that he previously knew nothing about. He then created a series of cinemagraphs -- or "moving photos" -- that offer a glimpse into what Monrovia is like.

Mesmerizing Cinemagraphs Capture The Monotony of ‘Routine’

How do you capture 'routine' on camera? That was the question that talented cinemagraph creator Julien Douvier (featured before here and here) was asking himself late last year. The answer, when it struck him, was simple: nothing is perhaps more routine than our early morning walk to work.

So he set about capturing that in the only way he knew how: photography with a touch of motion -- or videography with a touch of stillness -- in order words, cinemagraphs.

The Entrancing Cinemagraph Creations of Julien Douvier

The cinemagraph genre is one of the most exciting to follow because, unlike almost every other type of "photography" (in quotes since you they aren't photos in the traditional sense of the word), it's not yet oversaturated with phenomenal work.

Almost everywhere you turn you'll find a great street photographer, or landscape photographer, or fine art photographer. But when you stumble across a master at creating cinemagraphs, he or she is one of only a handful. Julien Douvier is one such photographer.

13 Beautiful Cinemagraphs of Water’s Movements

Having a stressful week? Here's a series of images that's perfect for you. It's a set of cinemagraphs (i.e. partially animated GIFs) created by Julien Douvier of Strasbourg, France. Each one features the simple concept of water's movement.

Beautiful Nature Cinemagraphs Created from Wildlife Documentaries

If you're a fan of cinemagraphs, you should take a look at the nature cinemagraphs being created by 28-year-old Netherlands-based visual artist Marinus. He has been using frames from popular wildlife documentaries (BBC's Winterwatch, Wonders of Life, and Natural World), turning them into beautiful animated loops that offer glimpses into the great outdoors.

Vimeo Picks Up Echograph, Video Loop War Heating Up

In what many are seeing as a bid to take over some of Twitter app Vine's newly created video loop market, video company Vimeo has bought up the popular iOS app Echograph. Echograph, in case you're not familiar with it, is an application that allows you to create animated GIFs, loops and cinemagraphs.

Microsoft Releases a Program for Making Cinemagraphs, or “Cliplets”

Cinemagraphs, or still images that have a dash of movement, have become very popular as of late. So popular, in fact, that Microsoft Research is jumping onto the bandwagon. The company has released a new tool for creating cinemagraphs, which they call "cliplets":

A still photograph is a limited format for capturing moments that span an interval of time. Video is the traditional method for recording durations of time, but the subjective "moment" that one desires to capture is often lost in the chaos of shaky camerawork, irrelevant background clutter, and noise that dominates most casually recorded video clips. This work provides a creative lens used to focus on important aspects of a moment by performing spatiotemporal compositing and editing on video-clip input. This is an interactive app that uses semi-automated methods to give users the power to create "cliplets"—a type of imagery that sits between stills and video from handheld videos.

Their free new Cliplets app lets you easily turn a 10-second video clip into a Harry Potter-esque cinemagraph.

Still Photos with a Dash of Movement

Photographer Jamie Beck has a beautiful series of images that she calls "cinemagraphs". They're animated GIFs in which only a small piece each photograph is animated, making them a neat fusion of still and moving images. It's amazing how much a tiny bit of movement in a still photo can do. They're almost like the moving pictures you see in Harry Potter!