Posts Tagged ‘concepts’

Filmmaker Shares Excellent Tips, Techniques and Concepts for All Visual Storytellers

Filmmaker Richard Michalak has spent over 30 years behind the camera, and in the video above by Hugh Fenton he condenses all of that knowledge into a set of tips, techniques and concepts that will prove to be incredibly useful whether or not your interests involve moving pictures. Read more…

Disorienting Portraits of People Walking About in a Tilted World

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Brooklyn-based photographer Romain Laurent‘s “Tilt” project from 2009 is one that turns an oh-so-simple concept into unique photos that instant grab your attention. Each photograph shows a person standing, walking, or skateboarding in an urban environment, except the whole world is tilted around them.
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An Introduction to Aspect Ratios and Compositional Theory

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Here’s a primer for beginning photographers on the concepts of aspect ratios and compositional theories.
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Rotor: A Concept Camera That Uses a Stack of Mode Dials

If for some reason you hate both buttons and touchscreens, then Rotor is a camera for you. It’s a concept camera designed by Charlie Nghiem that bases its entire user interface around a stack of physical mode dials. Rotate any of the dials, and the corresponding settings appear on the screen.

charlie nghiem: rotor digital camera (via Geeky Gadgets)

Brilliant Photo Printer Concept Lets You See What You Print

If Apple ever got into the photo printer business, this SWYP (“See What You Print”) printer might be similar to what they’d come up with. It’s a brilliant concept photo printer design by Artefact, the same design group that dreamed up the WVIL concept camera. Instead of having to send photos to the printer from a computer, users use a giant touchscreen interface that shows you exactly what’s going to pop out of the bottom. Come on SWYP, hurry up and exist!

‘Genetic Portraits’ Comparing the Faces of Family Members

“Genetic Portraits” is a series by Canadian photographer Ulric Collette in which he blends the portraits of two members of the same family into a single face. It’s interesting to see the similarities and differences among people who share DNA — especially when there’s identical twins.
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MMI Concept Camera Uses a Smartphone As Its LCD Screen

The WVIL concept camera that made the rounds on the Internet featured a lens that could operate separately from the camera body, but Or Leviteh‘s MMI camera is even simpler: it’s a small screen-less camera that uses a smartphone as its “camera body”.

MMI enables you to see what the camera sees on your [smartphone] screen, to adjust the settings as needed, and to see the results without getting up and even to upload the pictures online. From the application you can control all settings: white balance, focus, picture burst, timer and even tilt the camera lens, all without having to reach the camera.

Separating the lens and sensor components of a camera from its LCD screen and controls seems to be a pretty popular idea as of late (Nikon even showed off a similar concept camera recently).

MMI cam (via TrendHunter)

Satarii Star Camera Base Makes Cameras Follow Your Every Move

Shooting photos or video remotely may get a whole lot easier if a startup company named Satarii is able to raise enough funding ($20K) for their idea — a camera base called the Satarii Star that automatically keeps the lens pointed at a remote sensor. We could waste our breath explaining how it works and all the different applications it could be useful for, but the video above does quite a good job.

So far they’ve built a functional prototype that they showed off at CES, and raised about half their target funding. If you’d like to jump in on the project, visit their IndieGoGo page here.

Satarii Star Accessory (via Engadget)

Concept Cardboard Pinhole Camera Shoots Instant Photos

The “Flutter in Pinhole” is a beautiful concept camera that combines a cardboard pinhole camera with instant film to make sharing memories a breeze, and could be the high-tech postcard of the future.
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