PetaPixel

The “Most Important Ramification” of Wearable Lifelogging Cameras

There are a number of lifelogging camera projects racing to be first movers in the emerging industry of cameras that can capture every waking moment of our lives for future reference. Examples include Google Glass, Vuzix, and Memoto). The Huffington Post has published an interview with Memoto co-founder Martin Källström in which he shares some thoughts on what the future holds:

You actually can preserve memories of everyday situations. When I look back at what parts of my life I have documented or captured in photos, it’s really the moments where you’re all dressed up, everyone is smiling, it’s Christmas, it’s a birthday. Those are important moments, but I think it’s important to realize the power of everyday moments as well. Those moments should be given more value. The in-betweens are getting lost more and more.

Sadly, I’ve lost both my parents, and I really feel that my memories of them are fading much more quickly than I’d like them to. What’s left are the stories we’ve always told each other about what we experienced… and the photos that have ended up in albums.

The Master Photo Finishers of America would have loved a Memoto camera back in the early 20th century.

Memoto Camera Creator Imagines Life With Total Recall [The Huffington Post]


 
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  • http://www.facebook.com/jonathan.maniago Jonathan Maniago

    “When I look back at what parts of my life I have documented or captured in photos, it’s really the moments where you’re all dressed up, everyone is smiling, it’s Christmas, it’s a birthday.”

    And whose fault is it that everything else was left undocumented? Of course, it’s the camera’s.

  • https://twitter.com/#!/thelonelylights Adam Cross

    “move their production to China for cheaper labor” … I don’t understand – are you saying this is a good thing!?

  • eraserhead12

    I think it’s sensory overload. I appreciate the importance of the ‘small moments in life’, but not 100,000+ a month–it’s basically hoarding. I can only imagine how tedious it would be to go through all of them.

    plus, you have a camera with essentially at all times anyway–either your standalone camera, your phone, your tablet, etc. it takes two seconds to document something, if you bother to make the effort. the only reason I’d like this is for verification purposes–e.g. on the off-chance you got mugged and it snapped your assailant.

  • eraserhead12

    not to mention, I can’t imagine too many employers would be thrilled with their employees wearing them. think of all the instances where you’d have to remove/confiscate it lol

  • 9inchnail

    Anyone seen the movie “Strange Days”? I’m waiting for that kind of recording technology. Until then, please don’t bother me with your crap.

  • http://twitter.com/PhotoSquared Brad Calkins

    I think having a camera running at all time would change how you interact with people, so there would be fewer ‘real’ moments being captured. Sometimes memories are enough. Our memories are selective, in a good way. A running camera would have way too many laundry, dishes, and driving moments. Not to mention – what about when you go to the bathoom, the pool or are dressing your kids for school. There are a lot of moments you really don’t want to record or share with people.

  • http://www.kamophotos.com/ Kamo Photos

    Seems a bit creepy. From a privacy standpoint, sooner or later companies and governments would likely get access to this information. I think some things are best left to memories documented only in the mind.