PetaPixel

Bored at Work, Engineer Builds a Camera Out of Trash

Mechanical engineer and Flickr user Some Guy (Art) was bored at his job where picture taking was explicitly disallowed, so he did what any rebellious photo-fanatic would do: build a makeshift camera out of trash! Bringing $5 worth of parts (e.g. dowels, bolts, super glue) from home, he successfully turned some machine core — which he calls “cardboard toilet paper tube on steroids” — into a 35mm pinhole camera.

Here’s a photo he “snapped” with the camera without the aid of a viewfinder, frame counter, shutter, or meter. Exposure time was 15 minutes:

I didn’t let on that it worked so well because I feared for my job, as picture taking was explicitly disallowed. I tried to avoid taking pictures of secretive things or names, so this is what I’m left with. I have a new job now, so I feel like I can post these without too much worry. I’ll still keep anything that looks sensitive or has printed names secret, but I have a camera made from garbage that I have proved can take pictures. [#]

Sweet MacGyver skills. He should get hired as a spy or something.

Art’s Cameruh! (via DIYPhotography.net)


Image credits: Photographs by Some Guy (Art) and used with permission


 
  • Anonymous

    I used to teach a Camera Arts class in a “state institution” way back in the late 70s-early 80s, when I was still finding myself, and this was one of the first projects our class attempted. We had an old gravesite that was just perfect for these shots, and we developed and printed the photos ourselves. I wish I had the pics so I could scan them, but they have been lost in the shuffle of times since then. Still, it was good to concentrate on constructive things and teach others while learning more myself. It was considered one of the most successful programs in our system, until I was moved after 2 years. Believe it or not, I still consider those classes and the people who attended as “good times”. Nice article and beautiful “camera obscura” example. Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    I used to teach a Camera Arts class in a “state institution” way back in the late 70s-early 80s, when I was still finding myself, and this was one of the first projects our class attempted. We had an old gravesite that was just perfect for these shots, and we developed and printed the photos ourselves. I wish I had the pics so I could scan them, but they have been lost in the shuffle of times since then. Still, it was good to concentrate on constructive things and teach others while learning more myself. It was considered one of the most successful programs in our system, until I was moved after 2 years. Believe it or not, I still consider those classes and the people who attended as “good times”. Nice article and beautiful “camera obscura” example. Thanks!

  • Jayjay

    That’s great !

    But making pinhole camera’s ain’t that,… new… kinda popular even….

  • jessy johnson

    is that what you care about, “new” and “popular” ?

  • jessy johnson

    is that what you care about, “new” and “popular” ?

  • Jayjay

    No, but it’s not that special to be mentioned, there are hundreds, thousands of other people doing that too ;)

  • http://www.flyonthewall.uk.com/ Peter Harris

    Are there any detailed instructions on how to build this camera. It looks like an interesting project!