steam

Photo Trick: Use Hydrochloric Acid and Ammonia to Create Opaque Steam for Hot Drink Photos

When it comes to food photography, particularly beverages, one of the most difficult things to capture is steam. Not only do the drinks not stay warm for very long, but the steam is often nearly transparent and hard to catch on camera.

Thankfully, photographer Phillip McCordall has a clever trick that'll solve this problem for you -- that is, if you don’t mind working with hydrochloric acid and ammonia.

Self-Taught Photographer Travels the US Capturing Extraordinary Photos of Steam Locomotives

There's something grandiose about the sight of a steam locomotive rumbling down the tracks, massive white plumes billowing in its wake as the picturesque train rumbles and screeches down the metal track. And every ounce of the power and strength and nostalgia these trains evoke is captured in the photography of engineer and self-taught photographer Matthew Malkiewicz.

Want to Create Steam for a Food Shoot? Try Microwaving a Tampon

Nothing makes a bowl of soup, a cup of coffee, or in this case, a baked potato, look more warm and appetizing than a beautiful cloud of steam. Immediately, your taste buds think of a hot, comforting meal, and your nose can almost sniff the fresh-from-the-oven smell.

Tutorial: How to Get the Perfect Photo of a Steaming Cup of Coffee

Coffee is a wonderful thing. Early in the morning, there are few things that can put you at ease like a steaming cup of hot coffee warming your hands and firing up your brain. But have you ever wondered how those coffee advertisements manage to get the perfect shot of a coffee cup, steam and all?

Well, in the tutorial above, commercial photographer Robert Grant of LearnMyShot shows you how to compose and capture the perfect picture of a steaming cup o' joe that will have you craving your morning caffeine fix.