depression

Photographers on Facing Up to Mental Health in a Pandemic

For someone like myself, who suffers from quite bad anxiety during normal times, it’s safe to say facing potentially a whole calendar year of no work or income isn’t exactly a great tonic for one’s mental health. I have joked with my wife for a while now that at some point I want to take a year off -- this isn’t quite what I had in mind!

Why Artists are Never Happy: A Candid Message for Creatives

Whether you're a photographer, a filmmaker, a YouTuber, or a painter, this latest video by Kaiwan Shaban will probably hit home on some level. It's an honest, candid message for artists of all stripes who struggle with the fact that they are never quite satisfied with the work they are creating.

How Emotions Mold the Art We Create

Have you ever wondered why the images you created a few years ago look very different from the pictures you are taking now? Chances are you became a better photographer. You trained your eye and you got better at post-processing. But I am not talking about the craft. I am talking about the art behind photography. The art that feeds off your emotions.

My Surreal Photography is a Reflection on Years of Depression

My name is Gabriel Isak. Over the past year, I have been working on a collection of images in which I wanted to depict the internal world of solitary people who symbolize our own unconscious states. The work is inspired by the years I went through depression, where I wanted to reflect human experiences that would allow the viewer to reflect on their own journey.

How This Photographer is Using His Camera to Combat Depression

Photographer Greg Sheard has suffered from depression for nearly two decades now, but two years ago he took up a new weapon in his fight against it: his camera. In this 5-minute video, Sheard shares his personal experience in how photography has been helping him combat depression.

Photography is an Antidepressant

For me, photography is an escape. It offers a creative release which isn't generally available in everyday life. Those creative escapes can often be far more satisfying than just enjoying a few beers or binging Netflix.

A Duty of Care: Using Photography to Battle Anxiety and Depression

Meet Jim Mortram, a photographer with a past that involved battling anxiety and depression. Now he uses photography to interact with his community and draw attention to those who are "struggling to get by." In this 3-minute video by Wex Photo Video, find out what Mortram thinks about the power of photography.

Photographers Will Relate to This Filmmaker’s Thoughts on Depression

Don't let the Photoshopped facades fool you, creatives of all stripes deal with depression. That's the topic of this short-but-important video by Rob of Rob & Jonas' Filmmaking Tips. Rob is a filmmaker, but many photographers will instantly relate to the thoughts he shares in this video.

Stop Motion Starling Murmurations Created with Hand-Carved Birds

A European starling murmuration is one of the most beautiful natural phenomena on Earth—each bird reacting to its 7 closest neighbors, the whole flock an ever-shifting mix of patterns and shapes. So how in the world could you recreate something that intricate with stop motion photography?

Why Photography Matters To Me

I kept this post as a draft for months, unsure if I should publish it since it discusses things and events that aren't very easy to share. I hope it can inspire and help at least one person from my personal life experience.

San Francisco in the Great Depression: Photos by Dorothea Lange

In 1918, photographer Dorothea Lange left New York on a trip to travel the world. That ambitious trip was cut short by a robbery, and Lange ended up settling in the San Francisco Bay Area and opening a studio there. During the Great Depression, Langue took her camera out of the studio and onto the streets to document the country for the Farm Security Administration.

Dark and Haunting Portraits of People Struggling with ‘Emotional Cancers’

Photographer Alec Dawson regularly battles with what he calls "emotional cancers": inner struggles that include regret, isolation, anxiety, and depression. As a way to deal with his inner dramas, Dawson has created a photo project titled "Nobody Claps Anymore", a series of portraits of people in their homes, lit and captured in a way that conveys what he feels.