Posts Tagged ‘tintype’

These Are the First Combat Zone Tintype Photos Created Since the Civil War

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Ed Drew is an artist who’s studying at the San Francisco Art Institute, pursuing a BFA in sculpture with a minor in photography. He’s also a defensive heavy weapons and tactics specialist for the California Air National Guard.

When Drew was deployed to Helmand Province, Afghanistan this past April as a helicopter aerial gunner, he decided to bring his passion for photography with him. What resulted were the first tintype photos to be created in a combat zone since the Civil War.
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Tintype App Brings the Magic and History of Tintype Photography to iOS

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A few days ago, we told you about an app called Koloid that allowed iOS users to capture some of the look and feel of wet collodion photography using their iPhone. The $1 app let you not only take photos, but ‘develop’ them as well by tilting your phone to run chemicals over them.

The new app Tintype doesn’t go quite that far, but when it comes to authenticity, creator Michael Newton has made sure that his app brought the most accurate looking tintype processing possible to the iOS world. Read more…

Tintype Portraits of Photography Students Created on Their Discarded Film Canisters

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Photographer David Emitt Adams experiments with unique metal bases in his experiments with tintype photography. Last week we shared a project in which he used abandoned tin cans found in a desert to create tintype photographs.

36 Exposures is another project of his that uses unconventional materials for creating old school photos. It’s a series of tintype photographs that were created using 35mm film canisters.
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Photographer David Emitt Adams Creates Tintype Photos Using Rusty Old Cans

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Using discarded tin cans found on the hot Arizona desert ground, David Emitt Adams has created timeless pieces he calls Conversations with History. The cans are branded with tintype pictures, reflecting ties to the very locations the cans — some of which have been sitting out in the sun for over forty years — were found.

In the words of Adams, “The deserts of the West also have special significance in the history of photography. I have explored this landscape with an awareness of the photographers who have come before me, and this awareness has led me to pay close attention to the traces left behind by others.” Read more…

Tintype Portraits of Military Personnel in Both Uniform and Civilian Attire

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Warfare is often reduced to headlines in the news and numbers on a page, but it’s important to remember that there’s a human side to it. The soldiers fighting are fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, and sons and daughters of people back at home. This is the truth photographer Melissa Cacciola wants to remind the world though her project “War and Peace.”

The series consists of 48 tintype photographs of 24 active duty military personnel and veterans. Each subject is photographed both in uniform and in civilian attire.
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Service Turns Your Photos Into Authentic Tintypes and Tintype Pendants

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Getting an authentic tintype of yourself or one of your photos isn’t easy. Unless you live near Photobooth in San Francisco or know how to make one yourself, your options are extremely limited. There’s a new option available, however, and this one will let you order a tintype from the comfort of your couch.

Restoration company Digital Tintypes recently announced a new website by the same name that will take any photo you give them and turn it into an 8″ x 10″, 5″ x 7″, 2.5″ x 2.5″, or 1″ x 1″ pendant tintype using the original processing techniques. Read more…

Wet Plate Collodion Photography from a First-Person Point of View

Here’s a video that may be very interesting to you if you’ve never tried your hand at creating a tintype with wet plate collodion photography. Oklahoma City-based photographer Mark Zimmerman recently strapped a GoPro Hero 3 to his head and went through the entire process of creating a wet-plate photo on aluminum, from flowing the collodion in the beginning, through exposing it using his large format camera, and ending with a finished tintype photo of a camera.
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Stop-Motion Animation Created with 800+ Dry Plate Tintypes

The idea behind stop-motion videos is pretty simple: snap a lot of photographs in rapid succession and then string together all the images afterward to animate them. There was a time when the dominant photographic processes weren’t fast enough to create any meaningful kind of animation. Does that mean we’ll never see a stop-motion animation created using tintypes? Nope. The video above is one example of a stop-motion video created with a super old photographic process: the dry plate tintype.
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American Tintype: A Portrait of a Tintype Portrait Photographer

Documentary filmmaker and photography enthusiast Matt Morris recently noticed a magazine article about a tintype photographer named Harry Taylor based in his hometown of Wilmington, NC. Having recently gotten engaged, Morris and his fiancée decided to have Taylor shoot their engagement photos using the 150-year-old photo process. They ended up sitting for a 5-hour-portrait session, and Morris was stunned by the results.

A few months later, he decided to return to Taylors studio with two Canon 5Ds in tow and spent an afternoon documenting Harry’s work. The fantastic 4-minute documentary above is what resulted.
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Tiny Tintypes Created with a 110 Camera

Niniane Kelley of PhotoboothSF — the SF photo shop that still shoots tintype portraits — shot a series of tiny tintype photographs using a 110 camera. The images are likely the world’s first 110 tintypes, and the world’s smallest tintypes as well (each one is about half the size of a standard 35mm frame).
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