Posts Tagged ‘tintype’

Service Turns Your Photos Into Authentic Tintypes and Tintype Pendants

tintype

Getting an authentic tintype of yourself or one of your photos isn’t easy. Unless you live near Photobooth in San Francisco or know how to make one yourself, your options are extremely limited. There’s a new option available, however, and this one will let you order a tintype from the comfort of your couch.

Restoration company Digital Tintypes recently announced a new website by the same name that will take any photo you give them and turn it into an 8″ x 10″, 5″ x 7″, 2.5″ x 2.5″, or 1″ x 1″ pendant tintype using the original processing techniques. Read more…

Wet Plate Collodion Photography from a First-Person Point of View

Here’s a video that may be very interesting to you if you’ve never tried your hand at creating a tintype with wet plate collodion photography. Oklahoma City-based photographer Mark Zimmerman recently strapped a GoPro Hero 3 to his head and went through the entire process of creating a wet-plate photo on aluminum, from flowing the collodion in the beginning, through exposing it using his large format camera, and ending with a finished tintype photo of a camera.
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Stop-Motion Animation Created with 800+ Dry Plate Tintypes

The idea behind stop-motion videos is pretty simple: snap a lot of photographs in rapid succession and then string together all the images afterward to animate them. There was a time when the dominant photographic processes weren’t fast enough to create any meaningful kind of animation. Does that mean we’ll never see a stop-motion animation created using tintypes? Nope. The video above is one example of a stop-motion video created with a super old photographic process: the dry plate tintype.
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American Tintype: A Portrait of a Tintype Portrait Photographer

Documentary filmmaker and photography enthusiast Matt Morris recently noticed a magazine article about a tintype photographer named Harry Taylor based in his hometown of Wilmington, NC. Having recently gotten engaged, Morris and his fiancée decided to have Taylor shoot their engagement photos using the 150-year-old photo process. They ended up sitting for a 5-hour-portrait session, and Morris was stunned by the results.

A few months later, he decided to return to Taylors studio with two Canon 5Ds in tow and spent an afternoon documenting Harry’s work. The fantastic 4-minute documentary above is what resulted.
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Tiny Tintypes Created with a 110 Camera

Niniane Kelley of PhotoboothSF — the SF photo shop that still shoots tintype portraits — shot a series of tiny tintype photographs using a 110 camera. The images are likely the world’s first 110 tintypes, and the world’s smallest tintypes as well (each one is about half the size of a standard 35mm frame).
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Museum Asks for Help Identifying The Subjects In 150 Year Old Tintype Photos

Back in the days before every photo was tagged and shared with family, friends and strangers alike, a photograph was a rare, prized possession. In the Civil War era it wasn’t uncommon for soldiers to carry a small tintype of a family member into battle, and if they died, sadly so did all of the information about that photo. That’s why the Museum of the Confederacy needs your help.

They’ve had eight of these unidentified tintypes in their possession for over 60 years, but now, using the power of the internet, they’re hoping they might be able to identify the photos’ subjects and shed some proper light on these people’s history. If you think you might be able to help, head to the museum’s website to take a look at all eight pictures and maybe, just maybe, help them identify one.

(via Popular Photography)

The Science Behind Tintype Photography

Here’s another video featuring SF photo shop Photobooth and its tintype portraits. Will and Norm of Tested talk to shop owner Michael Shindler, who goes in depth into how tintype photographs are created and the science behind the process.

Tintype Portraits and the Shop in SF That Creates Them in 20 Minutes

If film is dying, then tintype photography has been extinct for years, but there’s still one studio/gallery in San Francisco that can immortalize your portrait using this classic method in as little as 20 minutes. This video done by Cool Hunting Video shows store co-founder Michael Shindler going through the whole process, from prepping the plates, to taking the photos with a modified camera, to developing the one-off direct positive. The results, as usual, speak for themselves.

(via Gizmodo)

One Photographer’s Personal Journey in Tintype Photography

Last week we shared an interesting video that shows how Civil War-era tintype photographs were created. Here’s another video on the process from a different angle: instead of discussing or showing the technical details, Michigan-based photographer Robert Shimmin talks about its history and his own journey with tintype photography. He says that the process is “a little bit like cooking and a little but like alchemy”. Unlike with more modern forms of photography, shooting tintypes forces Shimmin to carefully consider each shot due to the fact that each one requires so much time and effort.

(via MLive via PopPhoto)

How Civil War-Era Tintype Photographs Were Made

Ever wonder how photographs were made back in the days of the Civil War? This video by the George Eastman House provides an interesting step-by-step look at how tintype photographs are created. It’ll make you feel spoiled as a modern day photographer.

(via Photographs on the Brain)