Posts Tagged ‘musicvideo’

Using a Hand-Held Bullet-Time GoPro Rig to Shoot a Music Video

You might remember PermaGrin Films’ Marc Donahue from his amazing “Dream Music: Part 2″ lyric-lapse video that took 6 hours of work for every 3 seconds of footage. We even shared a behind the scenes look at how that time-lapse was put together, complete with deleted scenes and director commentary.

Dream Music: Part 2 ultimately got some 2 million views on YouTube, but that doesn’t mean that Donahue has slowed down. His most recent project again involved putting together a unique music video, only this time it didn’t take six months to shoot. Instead of tackling time-lapse, “On Smash Live” was filmed using a hand-held bullet-time GoPro array. Read more…

The First Ever Music Video Filmed Entirely Using Instagram

We all know Instagram as an app for retro-filtered photos, but have you ever considered using it to film a video, one photo at a time? That’s what director Arturo Perez Jr. did for the video above. It’s the official music video for the song “Invasión” by Mexico City-based band The Plastics Revolution.
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BTS: Photographing a Lyric-Lapse Music Video Over the Course of Six Months

Back in August we shared a mesmerizing stop-motion video titled “Dream Music: Part 2″ and created by Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams. The team spent 6-8 hours of work photographing every 3-4 seconds of the 8-minute music video. All in all, the project took six months to complete. The video above presents a behind-the-scenes look at how the whole thing was done, with director’s commentary, deleted scenes, and a bunch of time-lapses of the time-lapse being shot.
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A Music Video for Photographers That Parodies the Song “Billionaire”

Photographer Michel “Mijonju” Jones just sent us this humorous parody music video that he made with Irwin Wong, based on the song “Billionaire” by Bruno Mars. Here’s the chorus:

Oh every time I close my eyes. I dream to quit my nine to five… yeah… Spending all my savings to buy lights, oh my. I’m gonna feel alive, when I’m a cameraman.

This is actually the second photography-related parody music video that Wong has made. A year ago we also shared his “Pay Me” song based on Justin Bieber’s “Baby”.

An Amazing Imaginary World Created with 3 Projectors and a Blank Room

Last year, we shared an interesting video showing a blank white room that could be completely transformed in an instant using 3D projections beamed from two projectors overhead. The music video above, created filmmaker Filip Sterckx for the song “Sweater” by Willow, takes the idea of 3D projections in a blank room to a new level. Although it looks like the actor visits all kinds of crazy locations, everything is actually happening inside a small “room” consisting of one white floor and two white walls. The surfaces serve as canvases for imagery beamed from three $1,000 Panasonic PT-LB90 projectors. A moving treadmill on the ground adds to the effect.

It looks like Sterckx chose to go with CGI for the projected imagery, but imagine what this could look like if done with photos and videos of real locations. The next time you need to do a shoot in some exotic location, just buy a few projectors instead of a plane ticket!


Update: Whoa. It looks like Microsoft is trying to patent this kind of thing for consumer use. Imagine enjoying your images in a 360-degree immersive environments!

Linkin Park Browser-Based Music Video Incorporates Your Facebook Photos

Linkin Park has released a new music video that makes creative use of online photos. Visit the website for the song “Lost in the Echo”, and you’ll be asked to connect with the music video using your Facebook account. Once you provide it with access, it crunches some data, and then starts playing. The video starts out like many other videos, showing a group of people in what appears to be some kind of post-apocalyptic hideout. Then one of the characters pulls out a suitcase with photos, and something catches you eye: personal photos from your Facebook albums are shown inside the video!
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Lyric-Lapse Music Video That Required 6 Hours of Work for Every 3 Seconds

Dream Music: Part 2 is an amazing stop-motion and time-lapse video by Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams that features a technique they call “lyric-lapsing”. Using still photos, they somehow planned the time-lapse sequences just right, so that the singer in the video is actually mouthing the words as he scurries around to various locations. They state that the video is a “musical voyage into the depths of the subconscious”, and that it was designed to “transport the viewer from their own reality into a world of dreams and at the end, [...] awake to wonder how we were able to take them there.”

The magnitude of the effort is what’s truly impressive. The creators spent six months shooting the photos across two states. Every 3-4 seconds seen in the video required about 6-8 hours of work to create.
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Dizzying Animations that Show What San Francisco Looks Like to Superman

Director Kevin Parry recently finished creating a music video for the song “Water Falls” by Kalle Mattson. Filmed by Andrea Nesbitt, the video features some crazy time-lapse shots over great distances in San Francisco. Parry has also turned the shots into these animated GIFs that show you what various locations would look like if you were Superman whizzing around.
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17-20-23: A Lip-Sync Video That Spans Six Years

Alex Dainis of Boston first recorded herself lip-syncing the song “Aaron’s Party” by Aaron Carter back when she was 17. Three years later she made another recording, and finally this year — at the age of 23 — she made a third. This resulting video, titled 17-20-23, shows her singing her heart out at all three ages. She writes,

One take, once every three years. Sure there’s a story behind it, but mostly I just hope I’ll still be this ridiculous at 26, 29, 32…you get the idea. I think it’s simultaneously the best and worst idea I’ve ever had.

If you have children, you could start a yearly tradition of recording a lip-syncing video. It’d make for an awesome video once they’re adults.

(via Laughing Squid)

Stop Motion Music Video Featuring 500+ Girls Holding iPads

Orrin Hastings spent three months creating this stop-motion music video for the song “This Man’s Brighter Days” by abe&tell. He roamed the streets of Sydney asking 500+ girls to hold up an iPad containing one still frame extracted from a video. Played back, the stop motion contains a video-within-a-video. The concept is very similar to the J.Views video we shared a couple months back, except that one used actual prints.