PetaPixel

Project Uses a “Bullet Time” Camera Rig for 360-Degree Light Painting Portraits

For their project 24×360, Patrick Rochon, Timecode Lab, and Eric Paré combined a 360-degree “bullet time” rig with light painting and produced some pretty sweet results. The short teaser above shows some of the pieces they created.

Their rig consisted of 24 DSLR cameras pointing in toward the center of a circle. The cameras then simultaneously capture a long-exposure photograph while the light is being painted into the scene, producing a 360-degree view that can be enjoyed in a special viewer.

Here are some of the resulting shots:

You can find more of these images in the project’s online gallery (warning: some of the shots are slightly NSFW).

24×360 (via SLR Lounge)


If you liked this concept, you should check out the similar project photographer Richard Kendall did earlier this year. That one focuses more on light-painting than on portraiture, and uses a much larger rig.


 
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  • http://www.facebook.com/adam.murphy.967 Adam Murphy

    This is awesome

  • Mansgame

    Wow, THIS is talent. Using digital to its full potential and creating something unique. Unlike the person who was using the wrong film and wrong developer to make pictures look like they were spit out by a dog.

  • http://profiles.google.com/cgreever1 Charles Greever

    Yeah, good stuff, i guess it helps too if you have hot models.

  • Mike

    it never hurts

  • Opie

    Hey, let’s be open minded here. There’s no such thing as the “wrong” film or developer. Every artistic vision is just as incredible as the next.

    Ha, just kidding, those pictures sucked.

  • Opie

    But seriously, these are great. I’m curious to know how they kept the “light painter” from creating a shadow in the shots? Careful planning, I suppose. Or luck.

  • photosforus

    Forgive me, isn’t this the same thing as what was done on the matrix?

  • Mansgame

    I don’t think anybody would fault you for cloning out that part :) Just curious, how are you presenting the animation? It’s not flash I don’t think…

  • harumph

    …and 24 cameras.

  • http://twitter.com/ericpare Eric Paré

    hehe thanks :)

    for the shadows there is nothing obvious in the current sets, as we removed the most we can in Photoshop, but I plannify to add a serie of behind the scene / funny / untouched pictures, where we can see my arm moving, the cameras, the background.

    for the presentation, it’s just simple javascript displaying the 24 jpgs one after another…. It gives a much better result than video or flash, and it allows funny things inverting the animation.

  • thejudeman

    Wow! I miss seeing Patrick Rochon’s work! This is inspiring and phenomena! Awesome work sirs :)

  • DafOwen

    Fantastic!
    Wonderfully creative as well as cleverly techie <3

  • marc

    Defo a cool project.

    FYI using quotes in your title messes up the title in your Tweet link.

  • http://www.facebook.com/greg.sharpe.524 Greg Sharpe

    You guys achieved some stunning results!! I shared, tweeted, and posted on my facebook photography fan page. Keep up the innovation, you are a great inspiration. You should make a moving digital image gallery exhibit somewhere. Bravo!

  • http://twitter.com/ericpare Eric Paré

    thanks Greg :)

  • MangJose

    how did you make this RIG? do you have any? please post behind the scenes :)

  • http://twitter.com/ericpare Eric Paré 360

    we’re working on it :)

  • NewWiseGuy2

    Did it occur to you that these would also work in 3d? For each stereo image you would use the image from two adjacent cameras. If I can extract the individual images from the sample, I could show you how easy this would be.

  • http://ericpare.com/ Eric Pare

    @disqus_bjQ7RhRaza:disqus, have a look at this: http://lightspin.ericpare.com/documentary
    it explains a lot of things :)

  • Guest

    I thought it said “can be enjoyed BY a special viewer” and felt left out.