thenewyorktimes

Kharkiv, Ukraine March 2022

How Journalists Decide Which Sensitive War Photos Get Published

Since the start of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, nary a day goes by without the press publishing distressing war images, from slightly upsetting to the downright graphic. But, how do newsrooms decide on which war photos will get to see the front page and which ones will be shelved?

Adobe Wants to Help ‘Authenticate’ Your Photos: What Should Photographers Think?

At Adobe MAX 2019, Chief Product Officer Scott Belsky announced the Content Authenticity Initiative – a nascent and ambiguously defined way for attribution to travel with an image and allow consumers to know, in the words of Adobe VP Dana Rao, that “the content they’re seeing is authentic.”

The NYT’s Poor Caption and Dubious Image Selection of Hope Hicks

Unlike most types of photography, photojournalism abides a more stringent set of ethical guidelines because truth is paramount to accurate reporting. Many newspapers enforce their own ethical journalism guidelines, which tend to focus on retouching and the use of photo illustration techniques (e.g. compositing, timelapse, panoramic, etc).

Instagram May Soon Turn Paparazzi Into an Endangered Species

In recent years, photographers -- and particularly photojournalists -- have had to compete more and more aggressively with the everyday Joe and his smartphone who happens to be at the right place at the right time. And with technologies like CrowdOptic in the works that will help sift through the plethora of photographs taken every second, news agencies may soon be able to find that Joe in record time.

But according to an article by Jenna Wortham of The New York Times, one branch of photography is already taking a significant hit: the paparazzi are being replaced by Instagrammers. Using a recent photo of Beyoncé and her daughter as an example, Wortham shows how the paparazzi are already losing their battler with those same amateurs.