lenshood

Lens Hoods: Why, When, and How to Use One in Photography

Whenever you buy a new camera lens, you’ll often receive a free lens hood included with your purchase. And while many photographers leave it on without thinking twice about what it does, this handy tool isn’t just for show.

Nikon Patents Unique Dual Lens Hood and 16-35mm Full Frame Lens

Nikon has released some pretty interesting patents in the past. As recently as October of this last year we saw a patent for a camera attachment that blows air into the tripod mount to keep your sensor cool. Just days before that another patent showed that the company might be building features specific to "camera toss" photography into its compact and mirrorless cameras.

Nikon's most recent patent isn't quite as out there, but still unique as far as we can tell -- it's a dual lens hood.

Canon Has Not Started Bundling Hoods and Cases with Non-L Glass

Lens hoods and protective cases are nice accessories to have, but they're generally only bundled with professional L glass when it comes to Canon lenses. Canon USA almost never includes them with lenses that don't carry that distinctive red ring (or a green ring). Last week, Bryan Carnathan over at The Digital Picture recently noticed that the pre-order pages for the new Canon 35mm f/2 IS over on B&H and Adorama listed a hood and case as part of what's included. The news surely got many a Canonite wondering, "will bundled hoods and cases be included with non-L lenses now?"

Unfortunately, the answer is no -- at least for photographers in the US.

Hoocap: A Lens Cap That Transforms Into a Hood, and Vice Versa

Lens caps are often cast aside in favor of lens hoods, but what if you could have both in one accessory? That's what the Hoocap does. It's not as fancy as the blooming lens hood concept we featured a year ago, but it seems pretty well thought out. Extend the cap/hood out from your camera, and the two "curtains" open up, allowing the camera to "see" and blocking errant light from causing flares. Close it, twist it, and push it into your lens, and it locks into its closed position for protecting your glass.