Posts Tagged ‘pro’

Ho Ho Ho: Flickr Giving Away Three Free Months of Pro Membership

flickrprofreechristmas

If you’re a Flickr user, you can currently snag and open a Christmas present from the service a few days early. The photo sharing service — which has been undergoing a renaissance as of late — is currently handing out three free months of Pro membership. Simply log in to find a link to the present on your home page, or visit the Holiday Gift page directly.
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1000 Questions Answered by Professional Photographer Zack Arias

Zack Arias is a professional photographer based in Atlanta who runs a popular personal blog with a sizable following. He’s also runs the photography equivalent of Dear Abby.
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The Average Age of Pro Photographers

Ever wonder what the average age of professional photographers is? Dave Good of Rangefinder magazine writes,

Ed Lee is the group director of InfoTrends Worldwide Consumer and Professional Imaging Services. “The number of female photographers has grown,” he says. Now it’s a 2/3-to-1/3 split of males to females, a pickup from last year.” Forty percent of them are part time, while 28 percent, he says, are full time. “And it’s a younger female at that,” he says. “Age 45, and younger,” according to the 2011 & 2012 InfoTrends Professional Photographer Study.

“It comes down to the economy,” Lee says. “With families still struggling, people are turning to part-time photography as a way to bring money into the home.” He sees the photo business as a changing of the guard. “The average age of the full-time male photographer is 50. The average age of the full-time female photographer is 41.” The implication is that more full time male photographers are retiring. “You’re going to see a shifting towards an even higher percentage of females.”

The magazine’s entire Business Trends Report 2012 is worth a read if you’re at all interested in how the photo industry is changing.

State of the Industry: Business Trends 2012 [Rangefinder]


Thanks for sending in the tip, Phil!


Image credit: Photo illustration based on Tree rings by [email protected]

The 7 Levels of Awareness in Becoming a Professional Photographer

I have been taking pictures for almost twenty years now and so much has changed over those years. Back in the beginning gas used to cost $1.00, Bill Clinton was president, and I was picking up a camera for the first time. I started out in high school playing with my father’s Nikon FM2 and taking pictures for the school newspaper. Today, I work with a medium format digital back shooting national ad campaigns, magazine articles, and catalogs. Some aspects of how I photograph have stayed unchanged, but a great deal has changed considerably.
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So You Are Interested in Becoming a Photographer

I try to stay involved as much as I can with students studying photography at different institutions in the area. Every year I go back to RIT and do a lecture on the business of photography and I feel it’s important that I do so.

Recently I got an email from a young photographer asking me about the career of being a still life/food photographer.
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Nadav Kander Discusses His Approach to Portraiture

Here’s a video in which renowned portrait photographer Nadav Kander discusses his approach to photography and portraiture. One thing that’s interesting about Kander’s method is that he tries not to connect with his subjects prior to photographing them:

I really like the connection that human beings have when there isn’t a great knowledge, like when you first meet people. I would find it very, very hard to photograph a friend well, or to photograph somebody that I knew well. I think that that tension when you first meet people allows you to communicate without speaking

He does, however, make it a point to get to know their appearance… for the purpose of knowing who they are when they walk into the studio.

Theory vs. Reality: How Photographers Actually Spend Their Time

The International Society of Professional Wedding Photographers did a study a couple years ago on how photographers spend their time, and published these two charts showing the difference between what the general public thinks and what is actually the case. Here’s a larger version.

(via ISPWP via Scott Kelby)

Adjusting to the Changing Landscape of Professional Photography

Photographer Michael Freeman says that although things are getting tougher for professional photographers, the “consumption of imagery in all areas is actually increasing”. Professionals therefore need to think more about marketing themselves and specializing in a particular niche.

(via PhotoFidelity)

Protect Your High-Resolution Photos from Dishonest Clients

This comment posted (and deleted) by Reddit user WonkoTheLucid shows why photographers need to make sure their websites are secured properly:

My friends wedding photos were posted with watermarks on a photo reprint site for sale. The prices were a bit outrageous. Another friend who does web design clued me into manually entering the photo address to display a full resolution photo without a watermark. I wrote a script and downloaded 500 free high res photos. Burnt many dvd copies and mailed them to a bunch of random people who were at the wedding.

If you’re a professional photographer that lets clients review proofs online, make sure the high-res, non-watermarked versions of the photos aren’t accessible by simply changing a portion of the URL.

As a professional photographer, this really makes me angry [Reddit]

Win Your Portrait Subjects Over with Genuine Enthusiasm

Celebrity portrait photographer Chris Buck offers this tip for portraiture: be genuinely enthusiastic. Your enthusiasm can be infectious and make your subjects more comfortable with your ideas.

(via Strobist)