Posts Tagged ‘japan’

How to Turn a Compact Camera into a Radiation Detector

Andrew Lathrop came up with this novel way of building a simple radiation detector using an old compact camera, plastic scintillators, some reflective material, and black tape. A scintillator is material that lights up when exposed to radiation, and might be a little difficult for you to get your hands on unless you work in a science lab. Lathrop sent his idea to newspapers in Japan after the recent earthquake, but none of them decided to publish it.

(via PopPhoto)

Press This Cat’s Butt and 3-megapixel Photographs Come Out

The Necono Digital Camera is a funky cat-shaped digital camera out of Japan that might make it easier for you to take smiling baby photos. It’s a 3 megapixel camera that doesn’t have any LCD screen embedded for you to review your shots — you have to connect it to a “Monitor Ground” base that includes an LCD or transfer the images to your computer via USB. The cat has a shutter button on its butt, the camera and a self-timer LED in its eyes, and magnetic feet that allow you to stick it in random places.

Like many novelty cameras, the Necono doesn’t exactly come cheap… It’ll run you a whopping ¥15,750 ($192). At least you can be the only one among your friends to take pictures with a cat.
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Want an Ostrich Skin Camera? There’s a Leica for That!

Leave it to Leica to come up with funky ideas for limited edition cameras. After recently releasing a special edition “Le Mans” X1 with what appeared to be a simple sticker added to an otherwise standard camera, Leica is turning to exotic leathers. They’re releasing a limited edition X1 in Japan with black embossed ostrich skin. Only 80 of these cameras will be produced, and the skin bumps the price of the X1 from $1,995 up to $2,400. That is some expensive bird skin.

Apparently this isn’t the first time Leica has turned to the ostrich to make limited edition bodies — they did the same with the M6, and you can find ostrich-skinned M6 cameras floating around for sale on the web.

If you remember, the X1 is the camera that became the first compact to make it onto Getty’s approved cameras list.

(via Leica Rumors)

Olympus Looking into Making Lens Shake a Useful Feature

Olympus recently filed a patent in Japan for a novel lens feature that shakes the front element in order to remove droplets of water.

Filters would obviously render the shaking feature useless on a DSLR system, but for a smaller compact camera designed to be waterproof and rugged, this feature would probably come in handy.

The patent also seems to indicate that the shaking would occur during autofocusing, so the lens would be cleared of water immediately before the camera exposes a shot.

What are your thoughts on this potential future feature?

(via Photo Rumors)

Fujifilm Vending Machine in Japan

Check out this Fujifilm vending machine found in Japan by Lee Miller of The Other East. The thing sells 35mm and APS film, as well as disposable camera for snagging memories on the go.

Have you seen any of these things outside of Japan?


Image credit: Photograph by Lee Miller and used with permission

Rain Photographs by Navid Baraty

New York-based photographer Navid Baraty has a series of incredibly beautiful rain photographs made in San Francisco and Japan. We first came across the photograph above, titled “Rain Dance”, in Pictory’s “San Francisco” showcase. It was taken in San Francisco’s Union Square with a Nikon D700. There’s just something about the composition and lighting that blew us away.
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Nikon Patent Points at a Protective Barrier in Future EVIL Cameras

Another Nikon patent discovered recently provides yet another sneak peek at their yet-to-be-announced mirrorless, interchangeable lens camera.

This one seems to be for some sort of system that protects the inside of the camera body from dust and foreign objects when the lens is removed. It does make sense though, and I wonder why DSLR bodies don’t already do this?

It would be great if the camera automatically closed some sort of protective barrier whenever it detected that the lens was being removed. If you needed to actually see the innards of the camera, you could expose it via some option inside the menus, similar to how the sensor is exposed on DSLRs. Thoughts?
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Canon Imaging Head Says Future SLRs Will Be Smaller, But Not Necessarily EVIL

Today, Canon Japan’s Image Communication Products head Masaya Maeda said that Canon is working on a smaller version SLR to be released in the near future. In an interview with Reuters, Maeda said the idea behind the small SLR is that it could compete with Nikon’s future mirrorless system and other existing EVIL systems that are inherently more compact than most current mid-level DSLRs.

Maeda did not reveal whether the new Canon camera would include a mirror, but he suggested that the company has their focus elsewhere. Maeda said:

It’s not a question of whether or not you have a mirror. There is a consumer need for good-quality cameras to be made smaller … We will meet this need.

Still, Maeda did not commit to a solid answer about internal mirrors, though he suggested that there may be more ways to reduce the size of SLRs without removing the mirror.

Reuters cited an analyst, Kazumasa Kubota of Okasan Securities, who believes Canon may be wisest in sticking to traditional SLR designs. Kubota added, “Looking directly at something through a viewfinder is different from seeing it indirectly via semiconductors.”

What do you think? Is Canon on the right track, or are they missing the next gravy train?

(via Reuters)

Amazing Stop-Motion Super Mario Video Made with Sticky Notes

This stop-motion video will blow you away. Students in Japan created this video of Super Mario for a school festival using only sticky notes for the animation. Putting together the 1.5 minute video required two weeks of work and about 5,000 yen (~$55). I predict this video will go viral on the Internet in the next few days.

(via Boing Boing)

Dress Shirt with Built-In Microfiber Cloth

I don’t know about you, but I often find myself wiping off the LCD on my DSLR or point-and-shoot with my clothes. The unseemly but common practice of wiping gadgets with clothes is exactly what FIFT, a husband and wife design team in Japan, had in mind when they designed the ‘Wipe Shirt’.

This practical (but probably unfashionable) button down shirt has microfiber built into either the cuff or the shirttail, and allows you to clean your gadgets (and glasses) as you naturally would:

While cleaning your LCD screen might be perfect for this unique shirt, you probably wouldn’t want to touch anything more sensitive (i.e. your lens) with this, despite it being microfiber.

You can buy it for yourself or as a gift for ¥13,650 (~$148.5) straight from Japan.

(via Engadget)