Posts Tagged ‘japan’

Photos From Disposable Cameras Distributed After the Japanese Tsunami

You’ve probably seen countless photographs already of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan back in March, but they were likely captured by professional photographers looking to have the images published in news outlets. What, then, would photographs look like if they were taken by ordinary people who were directly affected by the disaster? Aichi Hirano found out the answer to this question by distributing 50 disposable cameras to survivors at a number of shelters with a note that read,

Please take photos of things you see with your eyes, things you want to record, remember, people near you, your loved ones, things you want to convey… please do so freely. And please enjoy the process if you can, even if it’s just a little bit.

Hirano did this once shortly after the disaster, then again two months later.

Rolls Tohoku (via Conscientious)

Wedding Rings Based on the Leica 50mm Summilux Lens

When two photographers got engaged in Japan, they asked their jewelry-maker friend to create wedding rings based on the Leica 50mm Summilux lens. The groom’s ring was the focusing ring while the bride’s was the aperture ring. The friend also created a stunningly realistic miniature Leica M3 to hold the rings (they slide onto the lens)!

(via Tokyo Camera Style)


Update: Here are some new photos of the rings:

This one shows the scale of the mini M3 next to actual Leica cameras:

Camera Industry Stocks Still Suffering After Japan Earthquake

The stock prices of major camera equipment manufacturers took a major — and expected — dive after the earthquake on March 11, 2011. Though they made a brief recovery afterward, they’re continuing to fall due to the risk that gear prices may soon skyrocket soar once decreased production isn’t able to meet demand.

(via Enticing the Light)

How to Turn a Compact Camera into a Radiation Detector

Andrew Lathrop came up with this novel way of building a simple radiation detector using an old compact camera, plastic scintillators, some reflective material, and black tape. A scintillator is material that lights up when exposed to radiation, and might be a little difficult for you to get your hands on unless you work in a science lab. Lathrop sent his idea to newspapers in Japan after the recent earthquake, but none of them decided to publish it.

(via PopPhoto)

Press This Cat’s Butt and 3-megapixel Photographs Come Out

The Necono Digital Camera is a funky cat-shaped digital camera out of Japan that might make it easier for you to take smiling baby photos. It’s a 3 megapixel camera that doesn’t have any LCD screen embedded for you to review your shots — you have to connect it to a “Monitor Ground” base that includes an LCD or transfer the images to your computer via USB. The cat has a shutter button on its butt, the camera and a self-timer LED in its eyes, and magnetic feet that allow you to stick it in random places.

Like many novelty cameras, the Necono doesn’t exactly come cheap… It’ll run you a whopping ¥15,750 ($192). At least you can be the only one among your friends to take pictures with a cat.
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Want an Ostrich Skin Camera? There’s a Leica for That!

Leave it to Leica to come up with funky ideas for limited edition cameras. After recently releasing a special edition “Le Mans” X1 with what appeared to be a simple sticker added to an otherwise standard camera, Leica is turning to exotic leathers. They’re releasing a limited edition X1 in Japan with black embossed ostrich skin. Only 80 of these cameras will be produced, and the skin bumps the price of the X1 from $1,995 up to $2,400. That is some expensive bird skin.

Apparently this isn’t the first time Leica has turned to the ostrich to make limited edition bodies — they did the same with the M6, and you can find ostrich-skinned M6 cameras floating around for sale on the web.

If you remember, the X1 is the camera that became the first compact to make it onto Getty’s approved cameras list.

(via Leica Rumors)

Olympus Looking into Making Lens Shake a Useful Feature

Olympus recently filed a patent in Japan for a novel lens feature that shakes the front element in order to remove droplets of water.

Filters would obviously render the shaking feature useless on a DSLR system, but for a smaller compact camera designed to be waterproof and rugged, this feature would probably come in handy.

The patent also seems to indicate that the shaking would occur during autofocusing, so the lens would be cleared of water immediately before the camera exposes a shot.

What are your thoughts on this potential future feature?

(via Photo Rumors)

Fujifilm Vending Machine in Japan

Check out this Fujifilm vending machine found in Japan by Lee Miller of The Other East. The thing sells 35mm and APS film, as well as disposable camera for snagging memories on the go.

Have you seen any of these things outside of Japan?


Image credit: Photograph by Lee Miller and used with permission

Rain Photographs by Navid Baraty

New York-based photographer Navid Baraty has a series of incredibly beautiful rain photographs made in San Francisco and Japan. We first came across the photograph above, titled “Rain Dance”, in Pictory’s “San Francisco” showcase. It was taken in San Francisco’s Union Square with a Nikon D700. There’s just something about the composition and lighting that blew us away.
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Nikon Patent Points at a Protective Barrier in Future EVIL Cameras

Another Nikon patent discovered recently provides yet another sneak peek at their yet-to-be-announced mirrorless, interchangeable lens camera.

This one seems to be for some sort of system that protects the inside of the camera body from dust and foreign objects when the lens is removed. It does make sense though, and I wonder why DSLR bodies don’t already do this?

It would be great if the camera automatically closed some sort of protective barrier whenever it detected that the lens was being removed. If you needed to actually see the innards of the camera, you could expose it via some option inside the menus, similar to how the sensor is exposed on DSLRs. Thoughts?
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