PetaPixel

RagLite Looks to Kickstart the World’s First Flexible LED Light Bank

With LED lighting systems growing in popularity for both video and photo use, it’s inevitable some interesting variations of such setups are going to come out. Case in point: behold the RagLite, or as its creators prefer to call it, “the first-ever flexible LED light bank.”

Developed by Chad Soderholm and engineered by Sin Cohen, RagLite uses a flat, lightweight design that is both waterproof and virtually indestructible. By combining a versatile mounting setup with a heat-free design, RagLite seems to offer, quite literally, a much more flexible option for lighting up scenes.

Color-matched to daylight or tungsten, the RagLite should work in almost any environment you toss it into. If you’re looking for an extra bit of pop, they are also offering up RGB versions that allow you to switch up the color output. And, finally, the RagLite also comes in a “Rugged” version that’s built for more demanding environments.

RagliteKickstarter

Ranging in size from a 4”x4” RagLite Mini for $75, to a 14”x24” color-corrected RagLite Cine for $2,400, there are plenty of options for anyone looking to get their hands on one. It’s by no means going to be the most powerful or perfectly color-balanced option available, but the pricing is much lower than alternative options and its portability definitely makes it stand out.

As of this writing, the team is just short of halfway to their $25,000 goal, with three weeks left to raise the rest. Head on over to the Raglite Kickstarter to dive into the details, look through the size options, and make your pledge.

(via PopPhoto)


 
  • http://www.facebook.com/nanonyous Theo Lubbe

    Not the ‘first-ever’. In 2011 some or other fashion designers in Tokyo made entire outfits out of ‘flexible LED light banks’. And yes, they looked patently ridiculous.

    What they may well be able to make a ‘first’ claim to is making a commercial product of it, though.

  • no secret

    first to overcharge for basics?

  • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

    I made something similar to this years ago for my studio years ago.
    There is nothing to this, it’s literally just connecting off-the-shelf LED strip lights to a power supply, and attaching those strips to a surface.
    LED striplights come in 3000K and 6000K varieties to match tungsten or sunlight.

    No engineering or research is required whatsoever, you just buy the light, attach it to something, then turn it on.
    What a joke.

  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    There’s probably slightly more to it than that… but I agree it’s massively overpriced for what it is. I think about $500 would be a sensible price for the largest unit..

  • Guu

    I agree and disagree at the same time.

    Not everyone has time (and know-how) to hassle around buying LED strips, glueing them to stuff etc – and how do you make the rugged one?

    Idea is not new and it is very simple indeed, but at the same many non-DIY people would prefer to have a pre-made product.
    So this bit – turning a simple trick into a product – is new and not-what-a-joke bit, in my opinion.

  • Green Banana

    All you need are some LED strips lights (which you can buy at IKEA), an inverter, a battery pack, and some black fabric material – Voila!

  • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

    Since individually addressable RGB LEDs hit the market last year, the price on solid colour LED strips dropped immensely, around $2 – $5 per meter.

    The large one would use about 10 meters of LED strips, costing about $50.

    The piece of fabric I’m not sure of, it might be some sort of magical super expensive fabric that is worth $100.

    For the D-rings, I’m going to assume they are using the expensive stainless ones rather than the super cheap ones, so that’s 10 cents per ring, or $0.40 per unit.

    For the wires, connectors, solder, and everything else, I’m guessing $20.

    So…that brings us to $170.40 per unit.

    Oh, and those numbers are the full retail prices, not the wholesale rates, so realistically, it’s going to be *much* less than that.

    If you are bringing a product to market, doubling the cost of materials twice is a good starting place, so $500 is fairly reasonable.
    If it costs you $125 to make it, sell it to a retailer for $250, for them to sell to the customer for $500. If you sell it directly for $250, retail will not touch you, because you have left them with no margin.

    (Can you tell that I’ve already designed, built, and sold something similar to this in the past…)

  • http://www.woodyoneal.com/ Woody ONeal

    Grow light will be popular in Colorado :)

  • Kelly Padgett

    insanely over priced like all lighting products in film and tv. A good example of this was Westcott Apollos Ice Light.. 500 dollars for a clunky light baton. Lets not forget LitePanels and their overpriced 1′x1′ squares at 2000 dollars a piece.

  • http://www.gannonburgett.com Gannon Burgett

    While this may be semantics, those weren’t designed to be “light banks,” they were just suits with LEDs embedded in them.

  • http://www.sin3rgy-creative.com/ David Liang

    I think the absurdity is in the pricing, it doesn’t follow any normal models.

    At $2400 for the largest strip and likely less than $200 of source material. I could hire a DIY or tech guy at $1000 to make the unit for me, and still come out saving $1200.

  • http://www.facebook.com/nanonyous Theo Lubbe

    Well, sure, but they looked, for all intents and purposes, exactly like these things do. Just larger pieces and without lassos with D-rings at the corners.

    That’s why I said the only ‘first’ claim I can see them realistically making is turning this into a commercial product specifically aimed at photographers and/or videographers. Even so, I cannot see any way they can justify those ridiculous prices for what these things are.

  • NDT001

    Its a great idea for professionals. It seems like a stupidly simple idea. Its similar to what Kino-Flo did when they first came to market. Took fluoro tubes, made them colour accurate, flicker free and durable enough to stand up to the abuse of day to day production, and now they are industry standard and nothing comes close to touching them.
    As far as im concerned, almost all LED’s ive used (apart from LitePanels and Dedo Felloni) give rubbish colour accuracy with massive green spike. Trust me, when your getting paid to light fast and quick, reliability, speed and colour accuracy are everything. Id happily pay what there asking if it delivers what ive stated above.

  • moonbase2

    because no one can bend a stabilize a softbox. LOL!

  • powellt

    as Stephen
    explained I am alarmed that a stay at home mom can get paid $7737 in a few
    weeks on the computer . check out here works77.ℂℴm

  • nikonian

    Ive worked in a sign shop… You can buy those suckers by the roll. Hook them up to a 120V Transformer, Stick them to a flexible substrate and connect the transformer to a battery and you have one of these…

  • nikonian

    Look at the Gary Fong. A rather simple idea sold for much more. The good ol sock / gel over flash wasn’t enough. If there is a market there will be buyers…

  • http://www.evildaystar.ca Eric Lefebvre

    I’m not sure your setup would be waterproof but I agree with the rest of your comment.

  • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

    You can get LED strips that are coated in a clear plastic to make the lights waterproof. I opt for non-waterproof because it’s 1-2 dollars cheaper per meter.

    Waterproof connectors, on the other hand, are not something I’ve worked with yet, so I might be wrong about that, but I can’t imagine them costing so much they blow out of my $20 price window for connectors, solder, etc.

  • Devon Wayne

    1) I have IP, design patent pending for flexible PCB attached to fabric.

    2) You’re correct, their unit costs less than $50 to make the large one. They use very, very cheap LED strips. smd 3528 and smd 5050 strips are inefficient – But yes, they are very cheap. 8 to 13 lumens per LED.
    (My LEDs will be 30-35 lumens per LED, and run on less energy, only 0.15w versus their 0.2w for less light!)

    3) Their light won’t put out the light you think it will.

    The light (I have design patent pending on, in which they are infringing) I am making will be 50,000 lumens. That means f4, 1/160, ISO 100 at 3 feet. The color temperaturate will be 5000k, my opinion of pure white light. The CRI rating is in fact 97 to 100. Yes, 100 on some panels I’ve made! (That means 0% green or 0% magenta shift.) The CRI can be proven with a PassPort ColoChecker white balance in Lightroom 4.

    When it comes to my LED panel, it’s not cheap to make. It’s 320w on a 12v circuit (remember, 50,000 lumens.) Each strip is $22, using 30 meters for a 1x4ft panel. Then I have a dimmer $30. Then I have the fabric $20. The I have the special flexible encasing $50. Then there is the optional wall power supply, which is a challenge for 320w, considering it’s 25-30aH of current. My power supply costs $75. Misc other supplies about $50.

    Basically, the cost to make a real photo/video quality flexible LED panel with 97-100 CRI is about $250. I’ll be selling mine for around $750. $250 to make one, $250 to make another, $250 to grow business. Yet, still very in-expensive.

    Keep in mind, that is without cost of labor, taxes, etc. So, realistically, I should price it out at $900 to $1,200 but we will see!

    Coming soon, by the way, keep a lookout!

  • Devon Wayne

    1) I have IP, design patent pending for flexible PCB attached to fabric.

    2) You’re correct, their unit costs less than $50 to make the large one. They use very, very cheap LED strips. smd 3528 and smd 5050 strips are inefficient – But yes, they are very cheap. 8 to 13 lumens per LED.
    (My LEDs will be 30-35 lumens per LED, and run on less energy, only 0.15w versus their 0.2w for less light!)

    3) Their light won’t put out the light you think it will.

    The light (I have design patent pending on, in which they are infringing) I am making will be 50,000 lumens. That means f4, 1/160, ISO 100 at 3 feet. The color temperaturate will be 5000k, my opinion of pure white light. The CRI rating is in fact 97 to 100. Yes, 100 on some panels I’ve made! (That means 0% green or 0% magenta shift.) The CRI can be proven with a PassPort ColoChecker white balance in Lightroom 4.

    When it comes to my LED panel, it’s not cheap to make. It’s 320w on a 12v circuit (remember, 50,000 lumens.) Each strip is $22, using 30 meters for a 1x4ft panel. Then I have a dimmer $30. Then I have the fabric $20. The I have the special flexible encasing $50. Then there is the optional wall power supply, which is a challenge for 320w considering mine is no noise and it’s 25-30aH of current. My power supply costs $75 to build separately. Misc other supplies about $50.

    Basically, the cost to make a real photo/video quality flexible LED panel with 97-100 CRI is about $250. I’ll be selling mine for around $750. $250 to make one, $250 to make another, $250 to grow business. Yet, still very in-expensive.

    Keep in mind, that is without cost of labor, taxes, etc. So, realistically, I should price it out at $900 to $1,200 but we will see!

    Coming soon, by the way, keep a lookout!