PetaPixel

Nikon Refutes Greenish Tint Issues, Says LCD on D4/D800 is More Accurate

Over the past week there have been several complaints lodged against Nikon claiming that the LCD screen on the D4 and D800 has a green cast when compared to the older models. Nikon, however, has responded by claiming that the D3s and D700 models were in fact the less accurate pair. According to Nikon Rumors, Nikon tech support is blaming the LCD on the D3s and D700, asserting that its higher display color temperatures leads to blue tinted images.

Naturally, this leaves us wondering if Nikon is just covering for an issue on the D4 and D800 by blaming the now discontinued older models, but we’ll leave that for you to decide based on the sample images.

(via Nikon Rumors)


Image credit: Photos by Benjamin Brolet and used with permission.


 
  • tomhenning

    Here we have a picture of two LCD screens, taken by an unknown camera, and viewed on readers’ mostly uncalibrated monitors, and it’s to be compared to a scene that we can’t see with our own eyes.  There’s nothing here to “decide” on.

  • koolaid

    unless you are really there at the scene of the photo . you cannot tell which is more accurate. how can i judge honestly which one is more accurate? if you asked me which picture looks more pleasing to the eyes i’d say from the D3s here

  • Jonas Nordlund

    Assuming proper white balance in the above photos, the D800 didn’t just have a slight weakness there. Jesus…

  • Ndt

    It seems the sport of complaining about trivialities with new camera technology is being elevated to new heights. I am constantly astounded how some so-called photographers (or wanna-be’s) will take any opportunity to pick the most minor detail out of these new cameras and blow them out of all relative proportion. 

  • Mark

    Well let’s see, I frequently change my camera profile to monochrome (while shooting RAW) so that all I see on the LCD is light information. I still plan on developing the images as color, but I have never used to LCD to judge color balance. If you do, then I assure you that you have more problems with photography than an ill-calibrated LCD screen. That screen is a convenience for the photog, nothing more. People need to stop relying on technology for things they should have learned early on. 

  • PJN

    After calibrating countless monitors I can agree with Nikon this is just our eye being used to the uncalibrated “blue-ish” look of stock displays (part of energy saving color calibration). All of my color calibrated screens (5-6 in all) look green to my eye but in fact are proper. Its hard to believe as my eyes think my iPhone or iPad screen is proper color when in fact its typically a little too warm and a little too cyan. 

  • http://twitter.com/zak Zak Henry

    I’m quite fond of using my screen to inspect details like whether or not someone has their eyes shut or not.

  • http://www.facebook.com/john.kantor John Kantor

    I don’t know what idiot would use a camera LCD for checking color – but the D3s above is obviously too magenta.

  • 9inchnail

    Everybody checks focus and details on the screen. But judging color on an uncalibrated screen is just futile, especially if you’re shooting RAW it just doesn’t matter what the colors look like on your camera. White balance and the chosen profile have an impact on the tiny preview you see on the camera but doesn’t affect the RAW file in any way.

  • mythbuster

     I don´t know what idiot would judge other people for using LCD to check colour. This is a professional device, isn´t it? Besides, I often check colour in the lcd in order to know if if there is a mistake in the selection of the wb preset or color temperature.

  • Mperry78

    Absolutely. If I had to rank the uses of my LCD from highest to lowest, it would look something like: Exposure (tonal range is where I want it), highlights (blown), focus, if I’m using an adequate shutter speed, details I couldn’t see while the mirror was up (eye blinking), impact of ISO in low light, and exposure info from older images and rarely will I do emergency “field edits” if I am running out of storage and I’ve left my card wallet where I shouldn’t have. On a side note, I notice that a lot of images I judge as throw-aways on the LCD are my keepers and a lot of the ones I think are keepers, turn out to be junk. I honestly wouldn’t mind just having a big screen with the histogram on it most times. :P

  • Mark Perry

    Now I’m going to have nightmares of a mini LCD screen calibrator device that you plug into the camera’s USB port and dangle over the back.

  • Trevor111

    Give us image from Canon to compare ;)

  • Ben

    Has anyone else noticed that they are asking us to compare Apples to Oranges?  The D800 screen is playing a JPEG image, the D3 is playing a NEF.  The JPEG could have been processed in-camera (when taken) using a pre-set output (Normal, Vivid, etc) that gets applied to JPEGS but not RAWS.  To me, this is like comparing a VW Bug to a Porche.  Both are great cars, but you can’t put them side by side as comparisons.

  • Damian

    Just use a gray card. problem solved.

  • virgilstarkwell

    three reasons why i think the green cast is a significant issue:

    – let’s say i’m shooting with flash and bouncing off a ceiling or wall. i want to rely on the lcd being accurate to see if i’m picking up any unwanted color.

    – my experience with my (now returned) d800 was that not only was the lcd green but the jpeg previews that were shown in lightroom were green as well (leading me to believe that the issue lies not with the lcd but with the way the camera is processing jpegs… which makes nikon either ignorant or fraudulent). seeing these green previews slows down my workflow, as i now need to render each image up big in lightroom to really see what it looks like.

    – furthermore, i just don’t buy the argument that my d700 was the one that was always flawed… as the colors always looked very pleasing and accurate. it seems that nikon is backpedaling and, a la apple, calling a defect a feature. in a $3000 camera, this is inexcusable. it should be right right out of the box.

  • Louis

     Well, I know Ben, the photographer who took these images and I also saw the screen side by side and I can tell you the issue is real and it’s the same with the D4 as well and not only one D4, it was compared to other D4’screens.. nikon tell us the older screens are faulty but from what my eyes saw in “real life” I think they are just serving us bullshit..

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Vikram-Vetrivel/671552602 Vikram Vetrivel

    Raw images cannot be displayed on screen as they are just pixel data. The images that you see on the LCD display, irrespective of whether they are of an NEF image, are always the JPEG equivalents of the same.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Vikram-Vetrivel/671552602 Vikram Vetrivel

    Raw images cannot be displayed on screen as they are just pixel data. The images that you see on the LCD display, irrespective of whether they are of an NEF image, are always the JPEG equivalents of the same.

  • Three_fitty

    Good spot!

  • http://www.learningdslrvideo.com Dugdale

    I’m starting to think this issue is a WB issue, can anyone watch my test to see if I did it correctly where I compare the LCD on the D800 to the Canon 5D3?
    http://www.learningdslrvideo.com/nikon-d800-greenish-lcd-tint/

  • Pjgreen4

    its green you can say what you want  – nikon can say what they want but its green.
    my shot is north light daylight  and d3 with a so called less quality (nikon ) LCD is amazingly accurate – The New D4 with its best LCD on the planet (nikon) is green

    crap is crap dudes..

  • Pjgreen4

    its green you can say what you want  – nikon can say what they want but its green.
    my shot is north light daylight  and d3 with a so called less quality (nikon ) LCD is amazingly accurate – The New D4 with its best LCD on the planet (nikon) is green

    crap is crap dudes..

  • Pjgreen4

    NIKON u – fKd – up admit it —  fix it and lets move on .. 

  • Pjgreen4

    NIKON u – fKd – up admit it —  fix it and lets move on .. 

  • Pjgreen4

     wrong dude  2look its green the shadows from north light are not bluish as in reality but green on the screen — bad LCD is a Bad LCD — next time your steak looks green go ahead and eat it because  the steak company sez its not …

  • http://twitter.com/_JessicaHowe Jessica Howe

    I have used a Canon 5D Mark 2 for the past 3 years, I switched to the Nikon d800 and HATE the screen. It is not accurate and definitely has a greenish tint. IT SUCKS.

  • Djsavill

    sod the LCD display, when i put the image into Lightroom 4 and take the greens right down the image turns into how it should look, ive had endless problems with the Nikon D800’s colour, large image size handling, and freezing issues… i guess when something looks too good to be true, like the Nikon D800 does being a 36MP camera for £2500, then it really is too good to be true! im bloody annoyed at myself for investing in this camera and giving nikon my money on this one, im preying Nikon will recall D800’s and change the sensor and the processor, the processor needs to be so much more powerful than it is its not man enough for the job!!

  • Djsavill

    i mean how can they say its the LCD screen when the image looks the same once uploaded to the computer???

  • Robert

    It goes further than WB.  When I customize my WB settings to +1 or +2 magenta then it looks perfect on screen.  However, when I take those images to my computer they are way too magenta.  That just shows the screen really is plagued with a green tinge. 

  • trish

    I have the same problem with my cameras. Both are Nikon D3000! I know this is one of the “cheap” camera’s but I bought the 2nd one as a back up and don’t get the same quality as the other. Did my own test today on both D3000’s and the D3200 I bought, and the quality of the D3200 is worse than the “green cast” screen on the D3000.

  • cheng

    is it too late to comment? its end of 2013 now. I rely heavily on LCD colours because I shoot for the media and PR agencies. I need to get accurate colours as there is no time for post processing. My photos are delivered to the media desk right out of my cf card.

    I think Nikon shouldnt make us go through Post Processing, it just defeats the price I pay for a top range model. If this is the case, why would cameras comes with White Balance feature. This is to allow you to tweak the colours correctly. Can Nikon remove the White Balance feature and charge us lesser for its cameras?

    Many photographers turn to Post Processing, don’t you want to shoot it right the first time? and save some time to colour correct your photos in the computer? Do you have alot of time in your hand? or do you simply want to give more work to your photo editor?

    Nikon ………. if its green , its green, Just admit it.

    cheers everyone. Happy 2014.

  • JB

    Put your boobs and your opinion away. It’s impossible for anyone who wasn’t at the scene to tell what is correct or incorrect.