PetaPixel

Extra Reach for Shooting the Moon

Now here’s a novel way to shoot the moon: stack five separate Canon 2x extenders to boost the focal length of your 800mm lens. Supposedly (and surprisingly) this rig actually captured a decent photograph of the moon.

This was done by the folks over at BorrowLenses, who also did the crazy filter stacking thing we featured recently. When you have as much gear as they do at your disposal, you have a wider range of ways to have fun with gear experiments.


Update: Josh from BorrowLenses tells me that with 5 extenders, the moon was actually bigger than the frame and the whole setup was “bending and flexing”:

With 3 extenders the photo turns out a lot better:


Disclosure: BorrowLenses is a sponsor of this blog, but — like last time — we came across this story on Reddit first


 
  • http://www.flyingsuicide.net/ Oj0

    I know this reply is late, but I came across the article from one of the random story links at the bottom of a recent article. The moon is bright, but each teleconverter costs a 2 stop loss of light. One converter puts it at f/11, two puts it at f/22, three at f/45, four at f/90 and five at f/180. The moon moves SURPRISINGLY quickly, I can see it when attached to my telescope which has a focal length of 900mm (1.6x crop puts it at an effective 1540mm). My telescope is f/11, so four stops brighter than the above setup.

    I’m using a 1/60 exposure at ISO 200 and getting fairly sharp images, I’m not going for slower speeds as I don’t have a T-mount adapter so I’m hand holding the camera to the end of the telescope, I can go about three stops slower with the adapter.

    The image above was apparently taken with an effective focal length of 21x that of my images, so we need 21x faster shutter speed to get sharp shots, or about 4.3 stops faster than my slowest possible of 1/8s. If we subtract 4.3 stops from the shutter speed and add it to the ISO we see that this shot is indeed possible. 1/160s f/180 ISO 8000. It’s more than possible.

    The maths that doesn’t hurt your head quite so much:

    What I did
    1/60s
    f/11
    ISO200

    What I could do with a T-mount adapter
    1/6s (3 stops slower)
    f/11
    ISO25 (not possible but three stops lower)

    What I’d need at f/180
    1/6s
    f/180 (four stops slower)
    ISO400 (four stops higher)

    To get 21x faster shutter speed (about 4.3 stops faster)
    1/160s (4.3 stops faster)
    f/180
    ISO8000 (4.3 stops higher)

  • GunnyNinja

    I appreciate the math, but maybe you should have explained it to the guy who said it wasn’t possible.

  • GunnyNinja

    I can get closer than the 2nd pic with my Panasonic FZ70.

  • http://www.flyingsuicide.net/ Oj0

    You’re right, I quoted the wrong person :(

  • http://www.flyingsuicide.net/ Oj0

    I know this reply is late, but I came across the article from one of the random story links at the bottom of a recent article. The moon is bright, but each teleconverter costs a 2 stop loss of light. One converter puts it at f/11, two puts it at f/22, three at f/45, four at f/90 and five at f/180. The moon moves SURPRISINGLY quickly, I can see it when attached to my telescope which has a focal length of 900mm (1.6x crop puts it at an effective 1540mm). My telescope is f/11, so four stops brighter than the above setup.

    I’m using a 1/60 exposure at ISO 200 and getting fairly sharp images, I’m not going for slower speeds as I don’t have a T-mount adapter so I’m hand holding the camera to the end of the telescope, I can go about three stops slower with the adapter.

    The image above was apparently taken with an effective focal length of 21x that of my images, so we need 21x faster shutter speed to get sharp shots, or about 4.3 stops faster than my slowest possible of 1/8s. If we subtract 4.3 stops from the shutter speed and add it to the ISO we see that this shot is indeed possible. 1/160s f/180 ISO 8000. It’s more than possible.

    The maths that doesn’t hurt your head quite so much:

    What I did
    1/60s
    f/11
    ISO200

    What I could do with a T-mount adapter
    1/6s (3 stops slower)
    f/11
    ISO25 (not possible but three stops lower)

    What I’d need at f/180
    1/6s
    f/180 (four stops slower)
    ISO400 (four stops higher)

    To get 21x faster shutter speed (about 4.3 stops faster)
    1/160s (4.3 stops faster)
    f/180
    ISO8000 (4.3 stops higher)