PetaPixel

Dogs Filmed at 1000 Frames Per Second

The above is a beautiful slow motion video (1000fps) shot of dogs jumping for dog treats flying through the air. It’s actually an advertisement for Pedigree, as you’ll see at the end. It’s interesting seeing all the little details our eyes can’t ordinarily pick up.

(via Boing Boing)


 
 
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  • kevjohn

    Someone over at Pedigree finally saw the Birds video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQ2R0c2lU54

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  • ralxz

    This is awesome hahah

  • theHerald

    This is actually closer to how dogs see; they see more frames than humans, which is why they are able to track objects moving in the air (like treats and frisbees) better than we do.

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  • Spurwolf

    Does anybody know what sort of dogs they are at the 21 and 27 second marks?

    I think at the 27 second mark, the dog is a Shiba Inu, although I'm not sure.

    Awesome ad.

    The smile on the dog at 57 seconds — brilliant.

  • h20rider

    27 second dog looks like a Shiba Inu

  • vicwiz

    dogs got nothing on my hand eye coordination.

  • AG84

    yep that's a Shiba Inu.. got one of my own :)

  • CrackedPepper86

    People don't see in “frames.” Neither do dogs.

  • Natalie Sharp

    Yeah, they definitely copied off of Pleix.

  • Tayfun Baltaci

    How about to smell and loyalty

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  • Bob Dobbs

    Yep, totally ripped from the Birds video.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Stuart-Mouritzen/3431698 Stuart Mouritzen

    Reminded me so much of the Vitalic music video, I had to make a blog post: http://quitmumbling.com/2010/07/old-favorite-vi

  • guest

    yes we do, our brain registers “frames” and adds them all up into the illusion of motion.
    And that goes for all animals that see the world through eyes.

  • Mike

    Definitely ripoff of poney pt 1 video by vitalic, not birds, and not original

  • Roscoe

    If people don't see in frames, explain the “wagon wheel” illusion for us.

  • Samuraipo77

    the one at 21 is some kind of terrier but i'm not sure which kind.

  • Eni

    I am a loser. This made me cry.

  • Tayfun Baltaci

    good loser

  • Scruffie2

    Does it matter who did what first? This was adorable!! Is there a cat one anywhere?

  • http://twitter.com/zeno001 Alan Henness

    The 'wagon wheel' illusion is cause by artificial lights illuminating the scene or the shutter of a movie.

  • http://www.grandrants.wordpress.com Gerry Ashley

    Yeah, but you've GOT to stop trying to lick yourself in public. It's really grossing people out.

  • http://www.grandrants.wordpress.com Gerry Ashley

    Yeah, but you've GOT to stop trying to lick yourself in public. It's really grossing people out.

  • mizh

    Dogs are amazing, wonderful animals

  • Lorettagable

    its true we do see in frames check out the terms micro expression, its why my dog looks at my funny when im rolling/ and why you might be really good looking but not photogenic

  • EAT SHIT

    HEY! It would be great if I could see the video in realtime — but the adverts on your stupid fucking website slow my mighty computer to a crawl! Thanks for nothing, dickheads!

  • Anonymous

    The one at 21sec is some kind of mix, I think. Looks like part West Highland White Terrier, and part… dunno. A Westie’s ears don’t flop over, but the face looks otherwise just right.

  • P_j_judge

    HAHAH i’ve never heard something so ignorant and self-assured at the same time. We see in frames? Haha wow… why would we need to see in frames when our brain is capable of constant light information? Light hits our eyes without pause and our eyes send information without pause. If the organic brain that evolved over millions of years didn’t completely overwhelm the capabilities of the camera that’s been in development for a few centuries, I would be sorely disappointed.

  • P_j_judge

    You’re bordering on pseudoscience of Chopra-esque proportions. Microexpression has nothing to do with how we see. Nor does it have to do with how your dog looks at you or why people are not photogenic. Microexpression is a very short involuntary facial expression when an intense emotion is suddenly felt.

  • Anonymous

    It’d be wiser for you to begin your arguments more politely, with more aplomb.

  • Appeltaart

    I had this exact idea the other day while playing fetch with my dog the other day
    needless to say I don’t have a high speed videocamera :(

  • Matheran89

    Dogs see more frames than us? I just lol’d.

  • jessca

    I think they were saying that people can view 4 (?) frames per second and see motion, but if a dog were to see the same clip, they would see a slide show.

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  • Moltobene11

    i dont know about you but i can track objects and frisbees pretty well man you dont need to see more frames to track things like that

  • Leigh

    Is that a boxer at the 00:58 sec mark?

  • brooke

    a good portion of the constant incoming information is cut out by the brain. during times of emergencies more information is logged and thus humans remember events in this [referring to the video above] sort of slow-mo fashion littered with normally missed minute details. so in a sense, humans do see in frames, or at least remember their sight in frames. vision, at least from memory standpoint, is strung together bits of information much like a movie or video. And vision could entirely be considered working memory altogether when perceived by the brain even in the present…so humans actually may see (in all present sense of the word) in frames, even though the eye constantly sends information to the brain. And I agree with theHerald; please don’t be so rude with your arguments.

  • Curious Guest

    What breed was that last dog?