Posts Tagged ‘trickery’

This Mind-Bending, Colorful Photo Mosaic is Actually a Single Photograph

singlephotograph

Check out this colorful photo mosaic created by photographer Bela Borsodi for the cover of the album “Terrain” by VLP (you can find a larger version here). Would you believe us if we told you that it’s actually a single photograph?

Well it is.
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Clever Hack for Shooting Lytro-Style DoF-Changeable Photos Using a DSLR

Lytro‘s groundbreaking consumer light-field camera made a splash in the camera industry this year by making it possible to refocus photographs after they’re shot. However, the cheapest model for the boxy device has a price tag of $399, and the reviews have been mixed so far.

If you’d like to play around with your own refocus-able photographs without having to buy an actual Lytro device, you can actually fake it using a standard DSLR camera (or any camera with manual focusing and a large-aperture lens).
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An Amazing Imaginary World Created with 3 Projectors and a Blank Room

Last year, we shared an interesting video showing a blank white room that could be completely transformed in an instant using 3D projections beamed from two projectors overhead. The music video above, created filmmaker Filip Sterckx for the song “Sweater” by Willow, takes the idea of 3D projections in a blank room to a new level. Although it looks like the actor visits all kinds of crazy locations, everything is actually happening inside a small “room” consisting of one white floor and two white walls. The surfaces serve as canvases for imagery beamed from three $1,000 Panasonic PT-LB90 projectors. A moving treadmill on the ground adds to the effect.

It looks like Sterckx chose to go with CGI for the projected imagery, but imagine what this could look like if done with photos and videos of real locations. The next time you need to do a shoot in some exotic location, just buy a few projectors instead of a plane ticket!


Update: Whoa. It looks like Microsoft is trying to patent this kind of thing for consumer use. Imagine enjoying your images in a 360-degree immersive environments!

Outer Space in a Studio: Nebulae Photos Using Fiber Glass Lamps

At first glance, the images in Fabian Oefner‘s Nebulae might look like images of distant galaxies captured with a space telescope. They were actually shot in a studio using a number of fiber glass lamps. Oefner used exposures of different lengths to capture the ends of the lit fiber glass as points and streaks of light. He then combined multiple images into single photos to achieve the “star density” seen in the final images.
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A Mind-Blowing Impossible Shot from the Movie ‘Contact’

This has to do with filmmaking rather than photography, but check out this jaw-dropping shot from the 1997 movie Contact. Can you figure out how it was created? Here’s the answer.

LEGO Rooms Photographed to Look like Full-Sized Spaces

Remember those beautiful macro photos that showed the inside of musical instruments as giant rooms? Sao Paolo, Brazil-based photographer Valentino Fialdini did something similar, except instead of musical instruments he used small chambers created out of LEGO blocks. With some clever lighting and camera trickery, Fialdini captured the tiny rooms and corridors as to look like giant architectural spaces.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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How to Turn Sunlight into Moonlight with Camera Trickery

This short video tutorial shows how you can shift the color balance of sunlight to create a blue background that looks like moonlight.

I wanted a night time look to this 20′s scene. Shooting later was not an option. This was a way to give a night time look to the sunlight streaming in the window. This technique can be applied to all types of photography. I saw a wedding photographer using this technique by putting a small amount of warm gel on his strobe which allowed him to let the background behind the bride and groom go slightly blue. This adds depth and interest. I have used it in corporate portraiture to create a cool background out of what was a boring scene. The blue becomes a unifying layer that pulls a background together into one element.

(via The Slanted Lens via NSOP)

Falling Water Frozen in Mid-Air with the Help of Frame Rate Trickery

When recording video, a camera’s frame rate can produce some pretty strange effects. If matched up with a helicopter’s blades, a helicopter looks like it’s hovering in midair with motionless blades. YouTube user mrbibio found that the same thing can be done with falling water. His technique is brilliant: by pressing a water tube against a speaker, mrbibio was able to control the vibration frequency of the water flowing through the tube. He then adjusted the pulses of the water to match up with the frame rate of his Canon 5D Mark II. The result is a video of the water looking as though it’s frozen in time.

(via Gizmodo via Photography Bay)

How Before and After Bodybuilding Photos are Often Faked

Here’s a clip from the bodybuilding documentary “Bigger Faster Stronger” in which photographer Rich Schaff spills the beans on some industry secrets for how those unbelievable before-and-after photos promoting bodybuilding products are made. He shows how both shots can be of the same model on the same day, with various tricks and image manipulations used to achieve the drastic differences you see.
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Creative Engagement Photo Showing Superhuman Strength

San Diego-based wedding photographer Aaron Willcox won 1st place in an engagement photo contest with this shot showing a feat of incredible strength. No Photoshop trickery or invisible wires were used in making this image (nor does the guy have Superman-esque strength). Can you figure out how it was done?

(via Photoxels)


Image credit: Photograph by Aaron Willcox and used with permission