Posts Tagged ‘london2012’

David Burnett’s Speed Graphic Photos of the London 2012 Olympics

davidburnett_londonolympics-4

Last August, we wrote about how renowned photojournalist David Burnett was spotted using a large format camera at the London Olympics. If you’ve been wondering how the photographs turned out, today’s your lucky day.

Here’s an inside look at how Burnett’s project came to be, and the beautiful images that resulted.
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Photos Documenting the Illegal Use of Olympic Branding

The 2012 London Olympics is pretty strict about how the Games’ branding is used, prohibiting the unauthorized use of everything from the Olympic symbol to the word “Olympic”. Enforcing the rules is another story, as businesses both near and far use Olympic branding extensively to promote their own interests. Photographer Craig Atkinson recently decided to start a project documenting illegal uses in London through a photo project titled Illegal Olympics.
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Canon’s Drool-Worthy Gear Room at the London Olympics

Canon Olympics Camera Gear Room

Welcome to camera gear heaven: here’s a glimpse inside the Canon Professional Services office at the London 2012 Olympics. It’s a room that’s absolutely stuffed with cameras, lenses, and accessories from floor to ceiling. The Canon 1D X hasn’t been released to the general public yet, but this room has hundreds of them!
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The Fancy Robotic DSLR Rigs Covering the Olympic Games

This behind-the-scenes video by the Associated Press gives a neat look at the various robotic cameras the agency will use at the London Olympic Games (earlier this month we shared some of Reuters’ rigs). Fancy remote-controlled rigs will allow for many photographic firsts, as cameras will be found in locations that were previously inaccessible. Wired writes that despite their usefulness, robotic cameras are causing some human photogs to sweat:

“We are essentially able to put cameras and photographers where they’ve never been before, capturing images in ways they’ve never been captured,” [Fabrizio] Bensch said. “For example, I’ve installed a robotic camera unit on a truss, 30 meters high — in a position where no photographer has been in a previous Olympics.”

For [Mark] Reblias, those are positions you just can’t compete against. With the traditional remote-control cameras, if the subject showed untethered joy five feet out of frame, you were out of luck. Now if Reuters is able to get that shot, “well, there’s nothing I can do,” he said. “Maybe I’ll have to upgrade my gear and make a robotic system. It’d be expensive, it might be a cost I have to take on.”

Robo-Cams at the Olympic Games Make Human Photogs Sweat [Wired]

Olympic Security Firm Under Fire Again for Refusing to Clarify Photography Rules

Photographically speaking, the London Olympics have caused quite a bit of confusion for ticket holders. Initially, the ticket holder agreement seemed to imply that you wouldn’t be allowed to upload any of the photos taken at the games to social networks; then once the rules were clarified, a size limit was set in place, but only in certain venues, outdoor venues were promised to be “more lenient;” and now it seems that Wembley Stadium (pictured above), where all of the Olympic soccer matches will be held, will not be allowing any “professional-style cameras [any camera with interchangeable lenses] or recording/transmitting devices.” Read more…

Getty To Capture Olympics With Helicams Timelapse, 360-Degree Cameras and More

You may or may not know this, but Getty Images is actually the official photo agency of the 2012 London Olympics, and they plan on making this one of the most innovatively captured events in the history of photography. To do this they’ve enlisted as many new technologies as they can get their hands on: be it 3D, time lapse, 360-degree, or even helicam aerial photography/video, Getty intends on giving the people at home as immersive an experience of the Summer Olympic Games as possible.

Check out the video above for more info on both the how and the why behind Getty’s plans, plus a cool peek at the kinds of helicam shots we can expect to see in about a month and a half’s time.

(via Popular Photography)

Olympic Committee Clarifies Photography Rules for London 2012

A month ago, quite a bit of controversy was stirred up when Amateur Photographer pointed out some stringent and seemingly unenforceable restrictions included in the London 2012 Ticker Holder Agreement. Initially it seemed that attendees might have been prevented from posting images to social networks (an assumption which was later refuted). But even though attendees will be allowed to post images to Facebook to their heart’s content, amateurs and non-media who wanted to get some commercial-grade pictures of the Olympic events are still out of luck. Read more…

London Artist Creates World’s Longest Photo Out of 109,000 Individual Images

In celebration of the upcoming London 2012 Olympic Games — or maybe just because she felt like it — London artist Clare Newton has stitched together 109,000 photos into the (not yet official) world’s longest photo. The entire Jump4London project, which consists of one very long composite photo of people jumping, has taken 21 months of Newton’s life and will span over one kilometer when it’s all said, done and printed. And although it’s not official yet, the photo will be inspected and approved by the Guinness Book of World Records while it’s on display at ExCel London from June 1 through June 9.

(via RPS via Popular Photography)

London Olympics Won’t Allow Sharing of Photos and Video via Social Networks

Photographers have already lodged complaints against the security firm that tried to prevent them from taking photos of the Olympic sites from public land, but it seems that even stricter rules will be imposed on ticket holders once the games begin. According to a freelance photographer named Peter Ruck, the Olympic organizing committee Locog intends to prevent attendees from uploading images and videos captured at the games to social networks.
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Olympics’ Security Guards Trained to Hinder Photographers

The Olympics are a big deal, and an even bigger opportunity for the country’s photographers. From the moment the next Olympic city is announced, preparations begin and an endless number of photo ops present themselves. That is, if the security guards don’t start harassing you.
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