Posts Tagged ‘computergenerated’

Check Out These Computer Generated 3D Renderings of DSLR Cameras

keyshot1

Back in March, we shared about how realistic computer generated images has been encroaching on the commercial product photography industry and killing photography jobs. More and more of the product photos you see in advertisements and press releases these days did not involve an actual camera and photographer at all, but rather artist, a computer, and 3D rendering software.

For example, the Nikon D60 product “photo” seen above was created entirely in Keyshot, a powerful 3D rendering program.
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Extremely Realistic Computer Generated Imagery is Killing Photography Jobs

photovsrender

One half of the face above is a photograph, and the other half is a highly detailed computer generated rendering created using a program called KeyShot by Luxion. Can you tell which is which? If you can’t tell, why should we? (Okay, to be honest, we’re not sure either).

Joseph Flaherty over at Wired writes that KeyShot and other programs that can generate photorealistic renders are being widely used for product photos these days, and are quickly killing off jobs that were once held by photographers.
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Photographers: You’re Being Replaced by Software

The image above is one-hundred percent fake. It has no connection whatsoever to the world of things. I created the bolts, lights, textures, and everything else in a free, open-source, relatively easy-to-use software package called Blender. It’s easy enough that even a novice user like me is able to make a pretty convincing image. If you are a photographer that makes a living shooting still-life photos, this should scare you.
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H&M Photoshops Model Heads Onto CGI Bodies

Clothing retailer H&M has sparked quite a bit of controversy after admitting that most of the models featured on its website are computer generated. The company says that pasting real model heads onto CGI bodies provides a better way of displaying clothes made for humans than using real humans to model them. Spokeswoman Nicole Christine tells ABC News:

This technique can be found in use throughout the industry. This is not to be seen as conveying a specific ideal or body type, but merely a technique to show our garments.

It is regrettable if we have led anyone to believe that the virtual mannequins should be real bodies. This is incorrect and has never been our intention. We will continue to discuss internally how we can be clearer about this in the information towards our customers.

Although the identical poses and proportions are hard to overlook, the company does match the skin tones of the bodies to the faces quite well, making the ‘shopped nature of individual photos difficult to detect.

(via Jezebel via kottke.org)

Amazing Effects From Popular TV Shows

Here’s a mind-blowing demo reel by Stargate Studios that will make you doubt everything you see on television in the future.

“Modern Times” Points to Future Times

“Modern Times” is a short film that offers a glimpse of the future in both the story that it tells and the way it was made — it’s a low/no budget film created entirely against a green screen with friends as actors. Maybe in the future shooting at real locations (or with real people) will be less and less necessary as CGI continues to become more and more mind-boggling.
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Fruits and Vegetables Falling and Shattering to Pieces

Alex Roman, the genius behind the breathtaking “The Third & The Seventh“, recently created this short commercial spot for Grupo Cosentino. It’s certainly stunning, but here’s the kicker: it’s completely computer generated, created by two people over the course of two and a half months.

Unbelievably Realistic Camera Tour of a Computer Generated Classroom

If you were reading PetaPixel earlier this year, you probably remember the jaw-dropping CGI animation titled “The Third & The Seventh“. Here’s another extremely realistic and detailed computer-generated animation that simulates a camera traveling through a classroom (with lens flares and all). It was created by Israel-based Studio Aiko.

The scene was modeled using 3D Max and rendered with V-Ray, and was created over a period of 6 months.
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