PetaPixel

2013 Pulitzer Prize Winners Announced, All Depict Syrian Civil War

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Columbia University has announced the winning photographs of both the Breaking News and Feature Photography Pulitzer prizes for 2013 — all of which depict the heartrending civil war in Syria. At first glance that may not seem like a big deal, but when you consider that the Breaking News prize wasn’t awarded to one, but five AP photographers jointly, the power of these photos begins to sink in.

At the top we have the winner of the Feature Photography Pulitzer, taken by freelance photographer Javier Manzano who we had the pleasure of interviewing in June of last year. The photo shows two rebel soldiers guarding their sniper’s nest in Aleppo, illuminated by light streaming through bullet holes.

Below we have one photo from each of the five Breaking News winners. All of these photos were taken in Syria, many in extremely hazardous situations:

A wounded woman leaves a hospital in Aleppo still in shock. (c) Manu Brabo, AP

A wounded woman leaves a hospital in Aleppo still in shock. (c) Manu Brabo, AP

A boy name Ahmed mourns for his father, who was killed by a Syrian army sniper.

A boy name Ahmed mourns for his father, who was killed by a Syrian army sniper. (c) Rodrigo Abd, AP

Ten-year-old Abdullah Ahmed recovering from burns he received during a Syrian government airstrike. (c) Muhammed Muheisen, AP

Ten-year-old Abdullah Ahmed recovering from burns he received during a Syrian government airstrike. (c) Muhammed Muheisen, AP

Free Syrian Army fighters resting in a house on the outskirts of Aleppo. (c) Khalil Hamra, AP

Free Syrian Army fighters resting in a house on the outskirts of Aleppo. (c) Khalil Hamra, AP

Rebel fighter gestures for victory after firing a missile toward a building where Syrian troops were hiding. (c) Narciso Contreras, AP

Rebel fighter gestures for victory after firing a missile toward a building where Syrian troops were hiding. (c) Narciso Contreras, AP

In addition to the recognition of their peers, all of the winners will also go home with $10,000 as further acknowledgement of the incredible photos they have taken. To see all of this year’s Pulitzer winners, including more detailed captions and additional photos from each of the AP photographers above, head over to the Pulitzer Prize website by clicking here.


Image credits: Photography by Javier Manzano, Manu Brabo, Rodrigo Abd, Muhammed Muheisen, Khalil Hamra, Narciso Contreras.


 
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  • John Kantor

    Power? The world still ignores it – for the same reason journalists don’t have the guts to fight to change what they see. Cowards and fools watch and take photos – then complain about the way the world is.

  • Furunomoe

    Hmm… time put a gazillion of lines on those photos and learn the composition!

  • Vincent

    Ah, you must be one of those brave revolutionaries who’s shed blood. Tell me more….(idiot)

  • http://furiousgryphon.com/ Thomas Oeser

    Those terrorists must be friends of Syria

  • madmax

    Mmmmmmmm…”Politizer” prize?

  • Anon

    firing a missile? can’t these guys even distinguish a rocket from a missile.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=506573278 Alexander Petricca

    A journalists image or words can spur many to act and accomplish more than one person could eve hope to achieve. See the bigger picture.

  • tttulio

    Syria is in.
    If you cover Bahrain you will be ignored.

  • http://www.facebook.com/duke.shin1 Duke Shin

    I have no idea where that is. I blame the schools.

  • Brendan Wixted

    Wow, incredible images!

  • junyo

    It’s right next to Whogivesafukastan.

  • junyo

    What’s with the random post deletions?

  • http://www.petapixel.com Michael Zhang

    We’re trying to keep the comments section of posts civil and on-topic. If comments are abusive or completely irrelevant there’s a good chance we’ll remove them.

  • junyo

    Then, as a suggestion, you might want to post some boilerplate somewhere that let’s posters know that comments or threads are subject to arbitrary censor. Not disputing that it’s your right, but the knowledge that the discussion is edited factors into the decision on whether or not you want to bother to participate.

  • Samuel

    Largely because Bahrain is far less hostile than Syria. AP, Reuters and numerous press agencies all issues warnings telling their photographers to get out of Syria. Those who stayed risk their lives to return these images.

  • tttulio

    The government of Bahrain has USA full support.
    That is the difference.

  • madmax

    Fools like you also die in wars. Or they lost the arms or legs or become tetraplegic or lunatic. And also, fools like you never know the true reasons of a war.

  • Spongebob Nopants

    I can see why there might have been deletable comments. All the winners were not just of the Syrian civil war but of rebel pov when depicting fighters or wounded civilians.

    I can see why that might inspire some, er, spirited debate.

    Did the people who pointed that out get some heated responces? Guess I’m about to find out.

    There could be several photographic and journalism reasons for that. Perhaps the government wouldn’t allow press. Perhaps they shot at journalists and this is AP’s responce.

    Vice did a fairly objective report on both sides of the conflict, showing positives and negatives of each- or, to be more objective, things the ethics or believability of which we could decide upon for ourselves. Whichever side came out with more warts is not relevant in this forum so I’ll keep that opinion to myself, where it belongs in this context. It’s objectivity in presenting the news is what is relevent in this millieu.
    But this isn’t news, it’s a contest of sorts – is the journalistic ethic of objectivity applicable to a contest? It may not be reporting but it’s still editorializing. Specific people chose which would be presented to the world as the best and which photographers to reward.
    It could be a veiled hint to photographers and journalists about who they should focus on in the conflict. Show this and you get a prize, show that and you won’t.

  • Spongebob Nopants

    I feel the need to add that the photographes are great and pretty darned gutsy. My pretty flowers and burlesque dancers will seem a little more trite from now on.

  • Spongebob Nopants

    Jeez guys. He’s wrong but there’s no need for nasty language.

  • 3Horn

    Hey man, dodging glitter bombs from burlesque performers can be hazardous in its own right. :)

    In all seriousness, I have much respect for conflict journalists.

  • 3Horn

    Impartiality and neutrality are the primary reasons why journalists *can* cover the stories they do.

    If we start choosing sides or presenting the information with a bias, then we do a disservice to our viewers and our subjects.

    We become not news gatherers, but propagandists.