PetaPixel

Ethereal Macro Photos of Snowflakes in the Moments Before They Disappear

Russian photographer Andrew Osokin is a master of winter macro photography. His photo collection is chock full of gorgeous super-close-up photographs of insects, flowers, snow, and frost. Among his most impressive shots are photographs of individual snowflakes that have fallen upon the ground and are in the process of melting away. The shots are so detailed and so perfectly framed that you might suspect them of being computer-generated fabrications.

They’re not though. The images were all captured using a Nikon D80 or Nikon D90 DSLR and a 60mm or 90mm macro lens.

You can enjoy many more of Osokin’s impressive photographs (16 pages worth, at the moment) over on his LensArt.ru website.

Andrew Osokin Photography [LensArt via The Curious Brain via Colossal]


Image credits: Photographs by Andrew Osokin and used with permission


 
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  • Peter D.

    Wow amazing………… :)

  • rohit

    awesome ppl how cud u possibly do that .. how come u know that this is the correct time to snap one
    ?

  • Pheona Cashews

    They’re flawless and beautiful.

  • syedazeembukhari

    nice info

  • ereunitiko

    amazing!!!!

  • maggie

    beautiful! makes you think of all the little things that go unnoticed everyday.

  • http://asianvasion.com/ Pramod

    Nice Pics . It is really good photography……

  • dabomb

    super cool

  • Cojonas

    beautiful ! Makes me think about all the things that we take for granted..

  • WilyCat

    Individual snowflakes are usually not visible, like in these photographs. Sophisticated camera lenses (which I know nothing about) make it possible to capture such small, time-sensitive items like this. These flakes are beautiful.

  • http://www.facebook.com/velvet.diamond.12 Velvet Diamond

    No, snowflakes aren’t at all visible to the human eye like that. The look like little clomps of white ice. Just like you would find in a snow cone like ice shavings, or a freezer or something.
    I grew up in a northern Virginia and had some very very snowy winters and springs….

  • Allouette

    Is there is a God,,,
    who invented all this; can it be all chemistry
    and physics? And who invented That !! ?
    the older I get the more I wonder ,,,,,

  • PJ Roscoe

    I am speechless and for an author that really is something! Excellent work x

  • John Korvac

    God bless physics of the natural world

  • Donna

    Magnificent photos! Such a magical moment to capture. I’ve never seen a snowflake in such a close-up view.

  • SuperSexyShane

    Wow this is really awesome. I showed my girl and her mom. My girl said “Nuh uh that’s fake, it’s to pretty!” and her mom said some look real but some look too pretty.

  • http://www.facebook.com/austin.barnes.79 Austin Barnes

    BEAUTIFUL

  • http://www.friv4.info/ friv 4

    I do not believe my eyes, it really is a great picture of nature

  • vincemad

    Nature is stunning. Seriously amazing shots.
    ..I wish for snowflakes here in the Philippines (even on summer). :-)

  • milianify80

    nice idea man..

  • Deb

    Awesomely beautiful!–and I don’t even like snow. ;) Thanks so much for sharing your creative ingenuity!

  • greg

    lol what

  • greg

    nope.

  • greg

    everyone likes snow unless they have to live in it.

  • greg

    Yep. Don’t be butthurt, listen to people who know what they are doing and learn from it. This is advice that people pay good money for in school.

  • greg

    holy crap, you people are morons. It’s relevant.

  • greg

    lol, your imaginary friend did none of this.

  • greg

    because one is an imaginary myth followed by morons, and the other is a relevant science that helps people learn and discover more about how the world and humanity works.

  • greg

    Teenager or the average religious zealot.

  • Shakil Prasla

    its a real art, awesome

  • georgemarkos

    I can hear the crunch now as I walk on a frost covered ground.

  • georgemarkos

    Praise is good, but criticism helps you improve. Ed Weston, paraphrased.

  • bob

    Dude , chill out. Yer in the wrong forum. No one in here is interested. in your content. It’s about the capture and viewing

  • Nikki

    While it’s good advice, I can still how BGenie just kind of comes off as sounding pretentious. Usually after you’re done ripping into something’s throat criticism-wise (even if it’s just a little) you follow it up with, “keep it up!” or something. Idk just to sound like less of a negative dick. Idk.

  • Toninha Veras

    OIÉ

  • Aldo López

    Great work!, I would like others to do the same on different countries, would the snow be different?

  • ElaineJHanson

    Don’t worry about deceiving. Now, its a completely secure way to make a 55$/hour.. Just go to this link -+- Bay35.cℴm

  • Dru

    Then you can also say physics created God.

  • Alix

    Amazing! Beautiful images.

  • http://www.lemagnifiqueblog.com/ Le Magnifique Blog

    These images are incredible!

  • http://www.vividthemes.net/ Aleksandar

    I think that even if you take multiple photos in same place all snow flakes would be different.

  • MarkmBha

    Constructive comments please!

  • MarkmBha

    Great shots!

  • http://www.worldwide-metal.org/ Morphine Child

    I’m speechless. Amazing photos, keep it up!

  • John Thomson

    God does not exist. Plain and simple.

  • http://www.friv2friv3friv4.com/ friv 2 friv 3 friv 4

    I see what you did there. You pretend to be above the debate while actually joining it. Clever.

  • Anthony J Gonzales

    Absolutely Stunning!! Thank you for sharing

  • Dave

    For another excellent photographer who does stunning snowflake photography, visit my friend Don. He also just recently released a book on the subject and shares the how-to side as well – Since this won’t allow hyperlinks go to w w w dot donkom dot com

  • paapeseed

    Take your dSLR lens, zoom it all the way in & then take the lens off the camera body, flip it 180 degrees and hold the lens up to the camera body to create a super macro lens.

  • Philip Han

    That’s what I was doing with a reversal ring, but there’s not enough light to get anything but a static shot.