PetaPixel

Large Objects Shot as Miniatures Using a Giant Coin and Tilt-Shift Effects

Norwegian design studio Skrekkøgle — the one that printed a photo with a cremated dog — has a creative project called “Big Money” in which they made a giant 20:1 replica of a 50 cent Euro coin. They then placed the coin next to large objects and photographed them together, making the objects look like tiny toy replicas.

Finally, here’s a photo showing how big the coin actually is:

If you want your own giant coin, they’re accepting orders through their online shop.

Big Money Project (via Reddit)


Image credits: Photographs by Skrekkøgle and used with permission


 
  • z2aStuff

    Yes, you’re totally right!
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    .
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    n.b: I was gonna complain about how stupid you sound, but as soon as I saw your Twitter profile (http://a3.twimg.com/profile_images/1379894356/180945341.gif) I understood saying anything would be a waste of energy and precious time :)

  • http://www.worleyway.com Steve Worley

    The blur is intentionally caused by a narrow depth-of-field, not the tilt-shift lens. A narrow depth-of-field is caused by using a smaller aperture and/or a longer focal length lens. The tilt shift only raises the height perspective. The narrow depth of field blur effect is a pretty clever one; it approximates the amount of blur you would see in a close-up photograph of a small object. It’s also effective as there are still a couple of people in this thread who believe the photos were ‘faked’ using real miniatures.

  • http://www.worleyway.com Steve Worley

    Correction: A narrow depth-of-field is ‘normally’ caused by using a smaller aperture and/or a longer focal length lens or shorter distance between the subject and the lens. The tilt-shift lens manipulates the depth-of-field too.

  • http://www.worleyway.com Steve Worley

    Correction: A narrow depth-of-field is ‘normally’ caused by using a *larger* aperture (=smaller f/stop #) and/or a longer focal length lens or shorter distance between the subject and the lens. The tilt-shift lens manipulates the depth-of-field too. Too early in the morning ….

  • http://viterbo.xbakeka.com/annunci-incontri-viterbo-1 Annunci Incontri Viterbo

    they all look miniature to me. It’s nice to have a huge object with lots of details and take a photo of it with a huge coin next to it.

  • Blackdarkness

    Reverse Tilt-shift, nice.

  • Dodgsun

    ah, guys…. it says…”Tilt Shift Effects”, not an actual TS lens!

  • Sorin

    Very interesting indeed

  • Lultrs

    you have a wonderful blog! your pictures are an insperation:)

  • guest

    @eriklaurikulo:disqus You’re an asshole. All of these items look miniature, and you can’t just give the guy the credit he deserves.

    Good job Michael! Great work.

  • Piornet

    Your MOM looks miniature to me.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Paul-Farah/100000689749486 Paul Farah

    No, that’s a real coin, and those are toy items.  the guy in the last photo is just really really small.

  • http://www.cshearing.com/hearing-aids-colorado/ Hearing Aids Colorado

    That’s amazing! I seriously thought they were toys.

  • http://northierthanthou.com/ northierthanthou

    The poor Liliputian doesn’t know what to do with the money.

  • titane78

    perfect!!!

  • ME

    i thought it was a normal coin but small objects at first
    -Mind Blow!!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/tamara.sauer.96 Tamara Sauer

    lool you can see, that everything is just a toy of the original. like the car, the motorbike. Not real things but just toys like those you use for train miniature landscapes

  • thespotlightkid

    well done, I love the miniature effect.

  • Blorp

    In the US, you’d have to make tiny football fields to make tiny things look bigger.