curiosity

4-Gigapixel Mars Panorama Created Using 407 Photos Taken by Curiosity

For a while now we've been sharing photos beamed home by NASA's rovers on Mars. From panoramas by the old timer Opportunity to selfies by the new kid Curiosity, we're starting to see more and more of the Red Planet many millions of miles away. Andrew Bodrov, however, has taken it to the next level.

A White-Balanced Panoramic Photo of a Martian Mountain, Courtesy of Curiosity

The latest panorama sent down by NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover is unique in more ways than one. Not only is it a panorama taken on another planet (still blows our minds), it's also been subjected to some post production. The photo -- a piece of which is seen above -- has actually had its white balance modified by NASA to make it look more like it was taken on Earth.

Curiosity Rover Beams Down Stunning Self-Portrait Panorama from Mars

When the Mars Rover Opportunity was nearing its 9th year in the Martian sun, we shared a beautiful panoramic landscape shot of the red planet taken by the aging rover. It makes sense then that Curiosity would eventually send down a panorama of its own. But just like you would expect from a younger generation of rover, it couldn't help but make the pano a selfie.

An Arm’s-Length Self-Portrait Captured Millions of Miles Away

Facebook users here on Earth aren't the only ones shooting arm's-length self-portraits: NASA's Curiosity rover over on Mars is doing it as well! Curiosity captured the image above a couple of days ago using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), which is attached to an extendable robotic arm. The image is actually a composite of 55 separate photos shot using the 2-megapixel RGB color CCD camera.

Footage of Curiosity’s Descent onto Mars Interpolated to 25 Frames per Second

NASA's Curiosity Rover snapped photographs at 5 frames per second as it descended onto the face of Mars a few weeks ago. The footage that results when the images are combined into a 15 frame per second HD video is pretty amazing, but apparently not amazing enough for a YouTube user named hahahaspam. He spent four straight days taking the 5 fps footage and interpolating it to 25 frames per second. This means that instead of a video showing the choppy landing at 3 times the actual speed, his video shows the landing smoothly and in real time!

The Curiosity Rover’s Descent into Mars as an Amazing HD Video

When NASA's Curiosity rover performed its "seven minutes of terror" landing on Mars a couple weeks ago, the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) camera had the task of capturing 1600x1200 (~1.9 megapixel) photographs at a rate of 5 frames per second. The camera began snapping away from when the heatshield separated to a few seconds after the rover touched down. The amazing high-definition video above was created with these photographs, showing what it's like to fall onto the surface of the red planet.

Why the Mars Curiosity Rover’s Cameras Are Lame by Today’s Standards

Ever since NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars and started beaming back photographs earlier this week, people have been wondering, "why are the photos so bad?" The criticism seems merited: consumers these days are snapping great high-res photographs using phones that cost just hundreds of dollars, yet NASA can't choose a camera with more than 2-megapixels of resolution for their $2.5 billion mission?

In an interview with dpreview, project manager Mike Ravine of Malin Space Science Systems -- the company that provided three of the rover's main cameras -- explains that there were a couple main reasons behind the "lame" cameras: data transfer and fixed specifications.

First Color Photo of Mars by the Curiosity Rover

After shooting black-and-white landscape photos for a day, everyone's favorite Martian robot photographer is now dabbling in color photography. NASA's Curiosity rover beamed back its first color photo today, showing the rim of its new crater home.

How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Will Shoot Photos of Mars

NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars this morning with much fanfare here on Earth. The photo above is one of the first photographs snapped by the rover and beamed back to Earth. Captured through a fisheye wide-angle lens, the landscape photo hows a gravel field in the foreground and the rim of the Gale Crater (the rover's new home) in the distance.

Avatar Director James Cameron Helping to Bring 3D Camera to Mars

In 2007 NASA scrapped plans to include a 3D camera on the Curiosity Mars rover, which is scheduled to leave for the red planet in 2011. However, Avatar director James Cameron was able to convince NASA administrator Charles Bolden to include the 3D cam again, and is now helping to build the camera with San Diego-based Malin Space Science Systems.