Posts Tagged ‘tags’

Yahoo! Snaps Up Startup IQ Engines, Will Improve Flickr Organization and Search

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Yahoo! certainly doesn’t shy away from acquiring companies it believes will help its cause. In some cases those acquisitions turn into long-term investments ala Flickr, in others the acquired company just sort of disappears.

The latest acquisition news out of the Yahoo! camp is that image-recognition startup IQ Engines is joining the Flickr team in order to help improve the organization and search features of the photo sharing site. Read more…

Sony Patent Reveals Plan to Start Tagging Photos with Vital Signs

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Have you ever looked back at a photo and wondered “what was my heart rate and blood pressure when I took this photo?” Yeah, neither have we. But on the off-chance that you have, a new Sony patent application might pique your interests.

The technology specified in the application intends to enable the company’s cameras and mobile devices to tag your photos with vital sign information — allowing you to not only ask those questions, but have them answered as well. Read more…

Do Hashtags Transform a Photo Into More Than Just a Photo?

Mike Rugnetta over on PBS’s Idea Channel asked an interesting question in last Wednesday’s episode: Is a tagged Instagram photo more than just a photo? Or, if you will, do hashtags add something (context, meaning, the ability to connect to a community) to photographs, thereby transforming the photo as we know it into a “different entity?” Read more…

Generate Tag Clouds of Your Flickr Tags

Tag clouds are a neat way of visualizing what content is about, and Tagerator is a simple program that generates them for your Flickr photo tags. Created by Jeremy Brooks (the guy behind SuperSetr), the simple Java app will run on any computer that has Java 1.6 installed. Besides its ability to generate the tag clouds for you, it stores the tag information gleaned from your account to disk, allowing you to use the tag/count information however you’d like.

Tagerator (via Thomas Hawk)