Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Fake Picture of Trayvon Martin Protests Being Spread on the Web

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Hundreds of thousands of protesters angry over the verdict in the George Zimmerman/Trayvon Martin trial swarmed San Francisco streets this weekend in numbers huge enough to shut down the Golden Gate Bridge.

At least that’s what happened in the world of social media, where a photo (above) of a pedestrian-filled 1987 celebration of the iconic bridge’s 50th anniversary circulated on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and their ilk posing as evidence of mass San Francisco reaction to Zimmerman’s acquittal.
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Instagram ‘Not a Photography Company,’ Says Co-Founder

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In case you thought Instagram was just about faux-antiquing images, au contraire. They’re not even a photography company, co-founder┬áKevin Systrom (shown above) clarified during a recent discussion at San Francisco’s Commonwealth Club.
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More Ways to View Lytro Photos with Google Chrome Extensions

Lytro has been pushing to make their living pictures — interactive, clickable photos that have a variable focus point — easier to share. Lytro is a camera that has a very specific, proprietary way of saving and viewing photographs, so sharing these photos can be tricky. Nevertheless, Lytro has been able to quickly expand living photos across the web through social media, most recently to Google+ and Pinterest through Google Chrome extensions.
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Flickr: The Game? Co-founder Butterfield’s Social Media MMORPG

Stewart ButterfieldMany many years ago, in 2005, the rapidly expanding social photo-sharing domain, Flickr was purchased by the larger web empire, Yahoo!

Three years afterwards, Flickr co-founder Stewart Butterfield left his kingdom, returning to his original life as a “tin-smith,” as he called himself in his resignation letter.

Now, Butterfield’s back in the game–literally.

According to reports by Canada’s Globe and Mail and the Business Insider, Butterfield’s revisiting his original project, Game Neverending, which is a massively multiplayer online role playing game (MMORPG).

Apparently, Butterfield and his group, Ludicorp, now Tiny Speck Inc., dreamed up the game and even had a closed Beta version up and running a year before Flickr launched.

Flickr was originally going to be an element of the gameplay, says the Business Insider–but whether the photo-sharing feature will exist in the new version is unknown.

The Game Neverending site is up, but outdated, with sparse information.

GNE Museum also has some cryptic information, including prototype screenshots that bring to mind 1980s video game artwork and a subway map:

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According to GNE Museum, the game involves the ability to travel to cleverly named locations, a humorous array of collectible items, and paper (as in reams, sheets, etc.) currency.

While there isn’t much information on the game itself, it’s probably the most honestly titled MMORPG out there–I mean honestly, when does anyone ever ‘finish’ playing WoW or DoTA, or Mafia Wars for that matter?

In any case, casual and social gaming like Facebook apps by Playfish/EA and countless iPhone games are prolific and easily accessible to a mainstream audience more than ever nowadays.

But after letting the project sit idly for so long, only time will tell whether Butterfield’s still got what it takes to ride the waves of Internet trends.


Image Credits: Stewart Butterfield by Wikimedia Commons and GNE Screenshot from GNE Museum