Posts Tagged ‘fun’

Buy this Canon 7D and 70-200mm Piggy Bank to Save Money

This Canon 7D and 70-200mm combo only costs $36 and helps you save money. How? Well it’s actually a fancy piggy bank! Like the Canon 350D and 24-105mm L piggy bank we shared last year, you use this one by shoving coins into the lens.
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Toy Camera Modded with Figurines to Add Tourist Silhouettes to Photos

San Francisco-based photographer Ian Tuttle came up with this funky way of adding silhouettes to his Diana F+ photos without Photoshop — using some Elmer’s glue, he attached a couple 1/8” figurines (the kind meant for model railroads) inside the camera upside down. The resulting photographs show a couple shadowy tourists looking at each scene!

Putting Your Subject Inside Your Camera (via Lomography via Make)

Recreate Your Photographs Using Text

Textify.it is a neat little web and iPhone app that recreates photographs using colored text. Simply drag and drop a photograph from your computer onto the page to get started. The image above is a photograph of Crater Lake that we turned into text using the letters from “PetaPixel”.

Textify.it (via kottke.org)

How to Give Your Bokeh Custom Shapes

Here’s another video tutorial teaching how to give your bokeh custom shapes.

When a point of light in a photograph is out of focus, it turns into a shape defined by the lens’s aperture. We can create a second, smaller, aperture to attach to the front of our lens in order to customize that shape. The result is a charming effect in the background of your photographs, as long as there points of light such as streetlights, candles, or Christmas lights in frame. [#]

You can also find a text version of this tutorial here.

(via Make)

Experiment with Random Lenses by Making Your Own Bellows

DC Watch has a tutorial on how to make your own bellows on which you can use various lenses (toy binoculars, magnifying glass, etc…). Print out the PDF template, then follow the video tutorial above to get started. Here’s a Google Translated version of the tutorial.

Bellows Lens Toy (via Nikon Rumors via Foto Actualidad)

Find, Arrange, and Shoot Things by Color

Here’s an idea for a quick photo activity (perhaps on a rainy day?): pick a random color, walk around your house and collect things that match that color, neatly arrange them, then take a picture.

(via Things Organized Neatly via Laughing Squid)

How to Make Your Own Redscale Film

Redscale is a technique where film is exposed on the wrong side — rather than having the light hit the emulsion directly, you expose the film through the non-sensitive side.

The name “redscale” comes because there is a strong color shift to red due to the red-sensitive layer of the film being exposed first, rather than last (the red layer is normally the bottom layer in C-41 (color print) film). All layers are sensitive to blue light, so normally the blue layer is on top, followed by a filter. In this technique, blue light exposes the layers containing red and green dyes, but the layer containing blue dye is left unexposed due to the filter. [#]

The two main ways for doing this are loading the film upside down (if your camera allows it), or by purchasing film that has been “converted” already. A third way is to make DIY redscale film by going into a darkroom, pulling out the film, cutting it, flipping it, taping it back together, and then winding it back into the canister. Messy, but it works!
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A Colorful 35mm Film Canister Collection

We suggested a couple weeks ago that you start collecting things via photos if your idea tank is running dry and you’re in need of a project. A neat photography-related item you can try collecting is 35mm film canisters — it’s kind of like collecting wine corks, though getting the film processed usually results in having the canisters tossed. The photo above shows Flickr user Wee Sen Goh‘s colorful collection.


Image credit: flickr by weesen

Turn Your Photos into Tiny Postcards

Here’s something cute and creative way to share your photographs: turn them into tiny, confetti-sized postcards. All you need to do is add your photo to the pre-made template and print it out. It’s designed by The World’s Smallest Post Service, and you can find a step-by-step tutorial over on Photojojo.

How to Turn Your Room into a Giant Camera Obscura

National Geographic created this nifty little video teaching how to turn any room with a view into a giant camera obscura. For an even more challenging project, you can try setting up some photo-sensitive paper (either photo paper or paper you paint with emulsion yourself) on the wall to shoot giant photos with your giant camera obscura.

(via Foto Actualidad)