PetaPixel

$500,000 Halftone Prints Made from 13,000 Platinum Beads

Do you have half a million dollars burning a hole in your pocket and the desire to purchase an extravagant portrait? Well, today is your lucky day, because Platinum Sphere Portraits is just what you’re looking for.

Starting at a cool $500K for a 23×32-inch “print,” these portraits are made out of tiny spheres of one of the most expensive metals on Earth: Platinum. One kilo of it to be precise, which is worth around $47,000 on its own.

Arranged one-by-one, 13,000 platinum spheres ranging in size from 2mm to 5mm end up creating a half-tone portrait fit for a space-age king:

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However, it’s worth pointing out that those of you wanting to get your latest favorite shot turned into a platinum masterpiece won’t have much control over the process.

You get a half-hour meeting with the company, after which they will assign a photographer to come shoot you for a couple of hours. From there, the image is digitized, hand assembled with the 13,000 platinum spheres, and you end up with a halftone portrait worth a whopping half million dollars… or so they would like you to believe.

There’s no doubt this is a ridiculous luxury that 99% of the world would never even think about. In essence, it seems like this print is meant to be one hell of an expensive conversation piece — although, to be fair, they do offer to send you a complimentary video of the print-making process.

What are your thoughts on these ultra-luxury pieces of art? Criticism is to be expected, but I’m curious to see if anyone can see some reason behind these bank bruising behemoths.

(via PopPhoto)


 
  • genexk

    why

  • Austin Bries

    I like it.

  • Karin

    Why can’t you do the same process with chrome balls or cheaper metal??? LOL

  • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

    Because chrome balls or cheaper metals aren’t platinum.

  • Jampy Joe

    yeah. it’s not about practicality, it’s about people who have more money than taste. also, platinum doesn’t corrode nearly as easily as chrome or cheaper metals, so it’s more “everlasting” or whatever.