PetaPixel

Tilt-Shift Effect Applied to Photographs of the Cosmos to Create a ‘Tiny Universe’

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Photographs of galaxies far far away rarely convey just how large what you’re looking at really is — after all, how can you even fathom something that is measured in light years across. But these photos of the cosmos do an even worse job. By applying the tilt-shift effect in post, these photos show galaxies and nebulae look like they could fit comfortably in the palm of your hand.

Credit for the idea belongs to Imgur user ScienceLlama, who took photographs from ESA, NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team and altered them by applying a tilt-shift effect in post. By narrowing the depth of field, ScienceLlama makes you feel like you’re staring at a little puff of pink smoke when, in reality, what you see is a nebula that is multiple light years across.

Here’s a look at some of the images he altered:

Horsehead Nebula Original image & credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Assembly and processing by Robert Gendler. http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/HH-HST-ESO.html

Horsehead Nebula
Original image & credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA).
Assembly and processing by Robert Gendler.

Tadpole Galaxy Original image & credit: Image produced with the HST data from the Hubble Legacy Archives. Processed by Bill Snyder http://billsnyderastrophotography.com/?page_id=2464

Tadpole Galaxy
Original image & credit: Image produced with the HST data from the Hubble Legacy Archives.
Processed by Bill Snyder

Pencil Nebula Original image & credit: ESO http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1236a/

Pencil Nebula
Original image & credit: ESO

Meathook Galaxy Original image & credit: ESO http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1115a/

Meathook Galaxy
Original image & credit: ESO

Crab Nebula Original image & credit: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130905.html

Crab Nebula
Original image & credit: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

Andromeda Galaxy Original image & credit: M31 in h-alpha by Adam Evans http://www.flickr.com/photos/astroporn/4999978603/

Andromeda Galaxy
Original image & credit: M31 in h-alpha by Adam Evans

You can see much higher resolution versions of all of these images by visiting ScienceLlama’s original Imgur gallery here. Or, if you want to browse through many more images like this, just minus the tilt-shift, head over to any of the source links above for more spectacular photographs of the cosmos.

(via Fstoppers)


Image credits: Photo credits included in captions, altered by ScienceLlama


 
  • Christian DeBaun

    These are great, and the faux tilt-shift has been cleverly applied here.

    When you apply this as an after-effect, it only seems to work well when the shot is obtuse (in other words – looking “downwards”) to achieve the miniature/model effect.

    The best ones are the Tadpole Galaxy, Pencil Nebula, and Andromeda Galaxies.

    Nice work.

  • Ayden Gotzmer

    Totally agree. The effect here is stunning and allows you to look at the galaxies in new ways.

  • Fullstop

    It’s hard to imagine that each galaxy is composed of up to and over 200 billion stars and that there are more than 100 billion galaxies in the known universe.

  • Jake

    “The galaxy is on Orion’s belt.”
    That quote takes on a whole new meaning here.

  • enderman

    Galaxies are terrible.

  • guu

    I feel like god!!! :)

  • Jimmy Fartpants

    They remind me of something you’d see in a museum.