PetaPixel

Deer Strolls by Oblivious Photographer

Being able to concentrate is a great quality to have as a photographer, but make sure it doesn’t make you tunnel vision and cause you to miss shots. Photographer Hans Kruse was photographing deer in a park outside Copenhagen, Denmark, when he spotted this wildlife photographer miss out on a close-up of a huge stag because he had his telephoto lens pointed in the wrong direction. He states,

The other photographer had been staring at the woods for a while while when this rather large deer appeared out of nowhere and tiptoed past him. I was laughing so much it was quite hard to take the picture.

This is the second story we’ve shared in the past week of a photographer not being aware of his surroundings.


Image credit: Photograph by Hans Kruse and used with permission


 
 
  • http://www.minusmanhattan.com Minus Manhattan

    That’s awesome.

  • -MARS- Photography

    Obvious photoshop is obvious

  • will hall

    The lessons here is one of three things:
    Option A: Always shoot with both eyes open to stay aware of your surroundings
    Option B: The length compression offered by telephoto lenses can play cool optical tricks
    Option C: When a huge stag walks next to you, stay still, don’t frighten it and definitely don’t start swinging a huge lens around.

  • Darren Ward79

    twoooo paps at one time, me thinks not, dude!!

  • Ahmed S. Messaoudi

    “This is the second story we’ve shared in the past week of a photographer not being aware of his surroundings.”
    PLZ STOP MAKING STORIES TO MAKE A POINT!!!! AGAIN IT WASN’T A PHOTOGRAPHER! IT WAS A CAMERAMAN!!!!

  • Chris

    Um….  that’s not a deer, that’s an elk.

  • Mute

    Lol, that’s funny, and a lovely photo.

  • Krijn_buijtelaar

    Another park in Denmark, same story. 
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnQemPDsmr0

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kathleen-Grace/1504717315 Kathleen Grace

    This is the issue with being so focused on one thing that you miss the good stuff happening.  Just like in the movies when they’re running from something horrible, they always fail to look in the other direction and then it gets them.  He’s just lucky it wasn’t a bear.

  • Tyroga

    Of course the photographer of this scene is assuming the other guy was ther to shoot stag, he may not have missed anything if he had no intention of photographing stag on this day.

    He may have decided his lens was too long to capture something so close.

    Also yeah, if something with big pointy horns like that was walking by me, I think I’d stay as still as can be.

    We’re far too quick to judge the intentions of others and cast ridicule.

  • http://twitter.com/Aarography Aaro Keipi

     I’m not a big fan of this “It seems unlikely to happen, so it must be photoshop” trend.

  • http://profiles.google.com/drfealko Daniel Fealko

    Obvious troll is obvious.

  • Jgronley

    I was gonna say: with that giant, long lens, he would have likely only captured a small piece of that elk/deer; I guess he could have snapped a very nice deer-eye photo.   And, we have no idea what he’s already pointing at; could have been something he’d carefully composed and didn’t want to miss.  Who knows?  Maybe he’s already got a huge collection of deer/elk photos…  Too many unknowns.

  • http://www.petapixel.com Michael Zhang

    We were reporting based on the news sites we referenced: https://news.google.com/news/story?gl=us&pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=til+germany+photographer&ncl=d5xz6k_PbM1bdAMZAF9Co1yU7bHzM

  • http://www.tutvid.com/ Nathaniel Dodson

    Sweet photo. Photoshop’d or not, it’s super cool looking!

  • Killermotion

    Hey guy, don’t read these if your just gonna piss and moan about it. Go make some news yourself.

  • Killermotion

    I live in the mountains. This stuff happens all the time. I have bears walk by me 10-15 feet away all the time walking through my yard.

  • Killermotion

    Thanks for pointing that out! I was just hoping someone would. During the rut, elk don’t give a crap about people. This happens all the time.

  • Sluggerjt44

    That is an elk not a deer. It is a bull elk not a stag.

  • Gunmanxxx

    this photo is so photoshopped it’s hard to believe it is authentic. I mean this is a possibility but not very convincing.

  • Jonas Andersen

    Gunmanxxx… after seeing the youtube clip posted in these comments, how can you call the photo photoshopped? The video clearly shows that it is common enough for someone to even shoot a video of it.

  • http://www.markjp.com Mark J P

    This is amusing.  I’ve seen this kind of thing a number of times (although never quite as spectacular as this photo).

    I saw something kind of similar in London last year with falcons:http://www.markjp.com/2011/06/17/missed-opportunity/

    I guess one of the problems with photoshop becoming more advanced and yet easier to use is that we are automatically sceptical of anything out of the ordinary! :)

  • A Peace

    can you say ELK!! 

  • rebecca

    This photo was taken in Europe, where the animals we call “elk” are referred to as red deer. In Europe, “elk” is the name used for what we would call a moose.

  • Jma

    happens here in my neck of the woods all the time.  That is not a deer, it is an elk. 

  • http://twitter.com/Presentitphoto Robin L Wilson

    Point of view can be so powerful…critic or not I find this photo entertaining. I believe it’s true, but regardless for those who question its validity…Photoshop enhances great photography….I think of it as an extension of the camera, an accessory. I find Hans Kruse’s photograph captivating.

  • CT

    It’s an elk. :)

  • Killermotion

    People in Europe have bad teeth. That is my response.

  • Ahmed S. Messaoudi
  • Ahmed S. Messaoudi

    Sorry! But I don’t feed Trolls!! ;)

  • Guest

    The photographer probably had a ton elk shots. Probably had quite a few walking around him at all times. The same thing happens in Banff, Canada where elk are pretty much considered citizens because they just hang out in town. 

    Dumb to call him oblivious. I am sure he got the shots he wanted. 

    *shakes head

  • Guest

    The photographer probably had a ton elk shots. Probably had quite a few walking around him at all times. The same thing happens in Banff, Canada where elk are pretty much considered citizens because they just hang out in town. 

    Dumb to call him oblivious. I am sure he got the shots he wanted. 

    *shakes head

  • Me

    I’ve shot the rut the last 3 years and that’s completely believable, stags wander around mainly concerned about each other and in a public park where the animals are used to people (and folks with long lenses) they come fairly close. I’ve been within 10 feet of deer whilst they are aware of me before now.

  • Spj4

    Nice Elk………..

  • Clay

    So…If it’s not photoshoped (it kind of looks like it is because of depth of field issues), why is it a big deal. It only looks like he is missing something impressive – How do you know what he is seeing in HIS lens? Perhaps a bigger deer? perhaps two deer fighting? perhaps just another large stag in a more natural setting than walking across the road? Plus, judging by the size of his lens he would only get a picture of this deers eye-ball.

  • http://twitter.com/TonyJPhoto Tony Johnson

    Exactly, Tyroga!  

  • http://rigu.co.uk/ Andrew Bowness

    It would be great to see what the other guy was taking a picture of. Even if it was mundane, in fact, if it was totally mundane it would probably make the story even better.

  • Jeramy Bailey

    Yeah, if that were an elk, it would be half again bigger. Also, elk tines don’t usually branch off in threes like the end of the closest beam on the above deer. Otherwise, they are a bit tough to distinguish.

  • Bob West

    State your case for Photoshopping. Provide details. Otherwise…

  • Bob West

    I see zero evidence of Photoshopping, including zero “depth of field issues”. It’s a freakin’ photograph, people. Calling every photo you see “Photoshopped” doesn’t make you smart or cool or entertaining or helpful. And it’s gotten really, really old. So could we please dial up the signal-to-noise ratio?

  • lseven

    What’s worse a photographer that doesn’t see a large animal nearby or one that doesn’t know the difference between a stag deer and a bull elk?

  • BCSD_accountability

    Strictly speaking, it’s a Wapiti– otherwise generically known as an American Elk, although considerably different from elk in Europe and Asia.
    Of course, they are all members of the ‘deer’ family so we can all be pedantic and right.

    They are very common (and a nuisance here in Idaho) so the photographer likely had plenty of wapiti photographs already.