PetaPixel

Optical Illusion: You’ll Want to Double Check This in Photoshop

We’ve shared a couple stories in the past month on how human eyes are very subjective and horrible as light meters, and here’s yet another mind-boggling example of how easily our eyes can be fooled by context. In the image above, the “blue” and the “green” stripes are exactly the same color.

(via Top Cultured)


 
 
  • Anonymous

    Reminded me of the optical illusion for the Daniel Eatock’s Big Brother 3 eye http://eatock.com/project/big-brother-3/

  • http://ssaft.com/Blog/dotclear/ Taupo

    More of these incredible illusions here: http://goo.gl/jhatJ

  • http://www.skinnerphotographs.com Skinner Photographs

    By God you are right! I didn’t believe it so I checked it on PS and the eyedropper reads “00ff96″ on both… and here I was thinking YOU were smoking crack. My Bad.

  • Z Griswold

    If you have a mac, use the control + 2 finger forward scroll to zoom into the middle, there you can clearly see it’s the same color.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Daniel-Austin-Hoherd/576367461 Daniel Austin Hoherd

    More benefits to being color blind? I don’t see the illusion.

  • Rod Landaeta

    Uhms, I can actually see the same colour on the border of the images…

    The computer can get confused as well when trying to get the actual approximation; Try the following as an experiment, copy this image and reduce it 50 percent in width or height (do not use smart objects) and then try to get both colours again.

    Photoshop (or any other tool) will give you different colours as well. Turns out our brain works with colour approximations instead of actual colours; saving ‘bandwidth’ when transmitting information from the eyes to the brain.

    With training you could break some of the illusions as your brain tries to get a better and stronger communication channel from the receptor to the stimuli processor.

  • Rod Landaeta

    Uhms, I can actually see the same colour on the border of the images…

    The computer can get confused as well when trying to get the actual approximation; Try the following as an experiment, copy this image and reduce it 50 percent in width or height (do not use smart objects) and then try to get both colours again.

    Photoshop (or any other tool) will give you different colours as well. Turns out our brain works with colour approximations instead of actual colours; saving ‘bandwidth’ when transmitting information from the eyes to the brain.

    With training you could break some of the illusions as your brain tries to get a better and stronger communication channel from the receptor to the stimuli processor.

  • http://www.facebook.com/mauricio.munuera Mauricio Munuera

    Fantastic observation!

  • http://dansdata.blogsome.com/ Dan

    It works if you “unwrap” it into straight stripes, too:
    http://dansdata.blogsome.com/2010/02/02/count-the-colours/

  • http://dansdata.blogsome.com/ Dan

    It works if you “unwrap” it into straight stripes, too:
    http://dansdata.blogsome.com/2010/02/02/count-the-colours/

  • http://dansdata.blogsome.com/ Dan

    It works if you “unwrap” it into straight stripes, too:
    http://dansdata.blogsome.com/2010/02/02/count-the-colours/

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1847169238 Ken Jones

    You can (well, I can) actually see the colors change if you hold your finger over the adjacent magenta stripes so it only shows the green.  Changes right in front of your eyes.

  • Km

    Also try reducing this picture in Photoshop and it changes the colours because of the pixel bleed. I’m not sure as a result at what time it’s the eye or when the computer starts modifying the display image. 

  • MarkStokes

    Great Optical Illusion.. but the statement “your eyes are horrible as a light meter” could be reversed.  Maybe they are BETTER as light meters because they can judge how other people will see an image rather than the technicality of what colour it really is?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001142643361 Kristofer Erendi

    it didnt change for me 0.o

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001142643361 Kristofer Erendi

    it didnt change for me 0.o

  • Patrick

    If you have a mac you can use the digital color meter utility. Set it to the minimum aperture and hold the mouse over the two color and you will see that they are the same. 

  • http://www.oamahou.com Outmaneamahou

    I wonder if Vasarely knew photoshop ! would have used the hands to create his masterpieces !

  • Gene

    The computer is not getting “confused”. When you reduce size, most programs (including photoshop) attempt to maintain as much perceptual data as possible by blending adjacent pixels to make up for the loss in resolution. Because the “blue” and “green” regions are adjacent to different colors (magenta and orange, or at least what appears to be those colors) this results in different colors. A program that naively just subsamples pixels in order to do the size reduction however, would maintain the same color.

  • Gene

    The computer is not getting “confused”. When you reduce size, most programs (including photoshop) attempt to maintain as much perceptual data as possible by blending adjacent pixels to make up for the loss in resolution. Because the “blue” and “green” regions are adjacent to different colors (magenta and orange, or at least what appears to be those colors) this results in different colors. A program that naively just subsamples pixels in order to do the size reduction however, would maintain the same color.

  • Anonymous

    this would be a great useful for those people who want to start
    their own website. it is my pleasure to be one of those people who commented
    on your resource. . thank you for give a opportunities… more power and best
    wished ..

  • Subiagroup

    thats how in the old color tv days, we could see any color only using the 3 primary colors, our eyes blended them to getherer

  • Rod Landaeta

    You are right Gene, the computer can’t get confused… I did an oversimplification of the down sampling of colours on the image as I was trying to illustrate a simple point.

    Now, there is no ‘perceptual data’ for a computer, as perception requires cognitive manipulation in a subconscious level. Instead image editing tools will try to blend the colour information to the closest value, introducing inaccuracies generating different two colours on the down sampled version.