PetaPixel

Debate Over Fabienne Cherisma Photos Rekindled After Award Given

During the aftermath of the devastating earthquake in Haiti, a number of images that became widely discussed were of 15-year-old Fabienne Cherisma, who was shot and killed by police after looting two plastic chairs and three framed pictures. One of these photographs (shown above), captured by photographer Paul Hansen, was recently chosen as the best International News Image at the Swedish Picture of the Year Awards. There was soon a good deal of discussion in the Swedish media over the ethics of such an image.

At the center of the controversy is an image made by photographer Nathan Weber, showing a group of photographers crowded around the body:

This behind-the-scenes look depicting photojournalists crowded around the scene of a tragic incident (continuing even after the family arrived and were grieving) shows what commonly needs to take place for the powerful images you see on the front page of newspapers and magazines.

What is your opinion on the ethics of this photograph? Should Hansen’s photograph have been selected for the award?

(via Prison Photography)


Image credits: Top photograph by Paul Hansen. Second photograph by Nathan Weber and used with permission


 
  • esp

    A 15 year old child is no child any more. It is a person who knew very well what she was doing.  And it was not an ordinary stealing something from somebody, in this tragic situation she was a  marauder and as such had to be shot. If there was a photographer around, it was his duty to show this to the world. And to show the grieving family members as well – with the purpose to arouse some thinking process in adults to pay attention to what games their grown-up kids are playing. And if the photo is good and contains the right message, why not give it a prise? It is not the same as enjoying bloody scenes.

  • esp

    A 15 year old child is no child any more. It is a person who knew very well what she was doing.  And it was not an ordinary stealing something from somebody, in this tragic situation she was a  marauder and as such had to be shot. If there was a photographer around, it was his duty to show this to the world. And to show the grieving family members as well – with the purpose to arouse some thinking process in adults to pay attention to what games their grown-up kids are playing. And if the photo is good and contains the right message, why not give it a prise? It is not the same as enjoying bloody scenes.

  • Anderson

    I love this image…awesome!!! Best image of 2011 hands down!!!

  • Mayekloca

    The life lost is truly imaginable for materials they felt the need to take her life. Then to see so many photographers there and then just walking away thats what made me cry that ur picture cost you’re soul also.

  • ash

    and i guess we have something in common for this case http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/4807865/ns/world_news-mideast/n_africa

  • happysnapper999

    Upon reflection, Nathan Weber should not have taken that photo, at least not sent it out. Why? Because the story was Haiti, not how that story was covered. End of story.

  • darwins beard

    The photographer and the guy with the pistol became lifelong friends after this picture was taken,the photographer Eddie Adams returned his Pulitzer prize because the damage done to the reputation of Nguyen Ngoc Loan (the guy with the pistol) after the picture was hijacked by the antiwar movement (sound familiar?) because it showed the execution of a Viet Cong who had just murdered a family with a machete. this is how Adams spoke of the picture after Loans death in 1998 “The guy was a hero. America should be crying. I just hate to see him go this way, without people knowing anything about him.”