PetaPixel

EyeSeeCam Tracks Your Gaze to Capture What You See

You’ve probably seen head-mounted cameras that capture point-of-view photos or videos before, but EyeSeeCam takes the POV concept to a new level. It’s a unique gaze-driven camera that focuses on whatever your eyes are looking at, making it the first camera system that records what your eyes are actually looking at. Here’s a demonstration of what the setup currently looks like in action:

Here’s a video created by the camera system showing the wearer reading a book:

Imagine the possibilities of this technology if it were made compact and ultra-portable. In a few years we might be beaming our personal memories to some data storage service for future reference. Rather than telling stories of our youth to grandchildren, we could show them the memories themselves.

Can you think of any interesting or useful applications of this technology if it were made more practical?


 
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  • http://grantdb.ca grantdb

    This could be used in helping people communicate through a computer by the user looking at pictures or words to ask or answer questions. Great post, thanks.

  • Bigdog

    Next time walk through the mall and check out the ladies. Nice.

  • Lieveliesje90

    I always imagine that I could make a picture of what I see with my eyes!

  • Guest

    “It’s a unique gaze-driven camera that focuses on whatever your eyes are looking at, making it the first camera system that records what your eyes are actually looking at.”

    I had a camcorder in the mid-90's – an 8mm Canon ES6000 – that did this exact same thing. One of it's features was that it could focus on wherever your eye was looking at in the viewfinder. From the ES6000 press release (Aug 26, 1996):

    “The ES6000 tracks the movement of the user's eye and automatically focuses on subjects anywhere within the viewfinder frame — not just in the center. Thus, creative focus shifting from one subject to another within a desired composition can easily be achieved by shifting one's gaze.”

    Looks like 14-year old technology to me.

  • kevjohn

    As displayed in the 1981 film “Looker”. This isn't exactly Earth-shattering tech here. I'm surprised it took 30 years to bring this to fruition.

  • Munky

    This could be utilized to aid in the diagnosis of certain types of learning disorders… Having the ability to further understand (though not completely) what a person is looking at and whether or not they're looking at it nearly the same way as someone who does not have a particular disorder.