Posts Tagged ‘videorecording’

Want to Record 4K Video Using Your iPhone 5S? This $999 App Will Let You Do Just That

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Say hello to 4K video recording with the iPhone… but first you’ll need a 5S model and a cool $999. That’s how much you’ll need to pay in the App Store to purchase Vizzywig 4K, which touts itself as the world’s first mobile app that lets you capture, edit, and distribute 4K video.
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Test Shows the Canon 6D Suffers From Way More Moiré Than the 5D Mark III

Reviews of the new entry-level full-frame Canon 6D DSLR are starting to make their ways onto the Web. While most reviewers seem to agree that the still image quality of the camera is quite good, the camera appears to suffer from a horrible moiré pattern problem. Gizmodo created the comparison test above pitting the 6D against the 5DMk3, and writes in their review:

All signs pointed toward the 6D sharing the same great video quality of the 5D MK3. The thing that the 5D3 does so well—that no other DSLR has accomplished—is reducing moire patterns (rainbow-like bands along detailed surfaces). But the 6D fails where the 5D3 prevailed. Moire is rampant. This single failure ruins the 6D as a viable alternative to the 5D3 for professional video.

If you’ve been eyeing the 6D, you might want to look elsewhere if solid video recording performance is a must-have for you.

Canon EOS 6D Review: Beautiful Full-Frame Stills, Crummy Full-Frame Video [Gizmodo]


P.S. You can find some other sample videos captured using the 6D here. The camera performs quite well in low light at high ISOs.

Canon 5D Mark III to Receive Major Video and AF Upgrades Next Year

Don’t worry Canon 5D Mark III shooters: Canon didn’t forget about you after all. Less than a week after announcing a highly-requested firmware update to the Canon 1D X to address AF complaints, Canon has revealed that a similar — but even better — update is also coming to the Canon 5D Mark III.

The upcoming firmware update will not only add support for cross-type AF using lens/extender combos with a max aperture of f/8, it’ll also allow for clean uncompressed HDMI out!
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5 Killer Canon Lenses for Recording Video with Your DSLR

Thinking about recording video with your Canon DSLR? stillmotion put together this short video with 5 lens recommendations based on their video production experiences over the years. One recommendation is the 24-105mm f/4 IS “kit” lens that comes bundled with higher-end Canon DSLRs. This lens allows you to have image stabilization at the wide end (24mm), perfect for tight spots in which you can’t bring bulkier stabilization systems.

(via Fstoppers)

How to Optimize Your Canon DSLR for Filmmaking

Here’s a helpful video that shows how you can optimize your Canon DSLR for video recording based on Vincent LaForet‘s recommendations. It’s geared towards the 5D Mark II, but is applicable for other video-capable DSLRs as well (e.g. 5D Mark III and 7D). There’s also an article over on LaForet’s blog that explains the reasoning behind the various settings.

Setting up your Canon 5D MKII [Vincent LaForet]

Comparing Video from the Canon 5D Mark II and 5D Mark III at ISO 12,800

Japanese website mono-logue released this short 30-second video comparing footage from the Canon 5D Mark II and the new 5D Mark III captured at ISO 12,800. The difference in noise levels is remarkable (be sure to watch it full screen and in HD).
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More Nikon D4 Photo and Spec Leaks, Heavy Push Toward Video

Nikon will reportedly announce its new D4 DSLR at a press event this Friday, but new details beyond previously leaked specs are emerging. The 16.2MP camera will be available starting next month for $6,000. Its ISO goes up to 102,400, but can be expanded to 204,800. There’s also a heavy emphasis on video: it’ll have a dedicated video button, H.264 B frame compression, contrast detect AF during recording, a low pass filter, and a smooth aperture change feature.

(via Nikon Rumors)

Yes, This Was Made with a Phone: Short Video Shot with the iPhone 4S

Earlier today we shared an interesting video comparing 1080p video shot with the iPhone 4S with footage from a Canon 5D Mark II. Here’s another short video demonstrating the quality of the new f/2.4 lens and Sony-made sensor, created by photographer and filmmaker Benjamin Dowie. He says,

Got an iPhone 4S yesterday and got up this morning to go for a surf. No surf, so thought I’d shoot some stuff to see what the new camera is like on the 4S. Got home, looked at the footage, and couldn’t believe it came out of a phone. Was so excited so thought I’d quickly cut a vid to share the goodness.

It’s actually amazing. The automatic stabilisation seems to work wonders, and gets rid of most the jello. Depth of field is flipping awesome. Colours are really good straight out the camera, but I did give this footage a slight grade. [#]

For a comparison of the cameras found on the latest smartphones, check out this smartphone camera showdown published by Engadget today.

(via Mashable)

iPhone 4S vs Canon 5D Mark II: A Side-by-Side Comparison of 1080p HD Video

Here’s a test comparing the 1080p HD video recording capabilities of the iPhone 4S and the Canon 5D Mark II. Vimeo user Robino Films shot the same scenes at the same time with both cameras using a special rig, and then synched the footage together. They also tried to match the exposure, shutter speed, frame rate, and picture style as much as possible.

Sony NEX-5N Sensor Overheating Test

Last September, Sony issued a notice informing customers that its pellicle mirror cameras would overheat during extended periods of video recording. Rather than maximum clip lengths, the company’s cameras are apparently limited by how long the sensor can endure high temperatures. In the video above, someone tests Sony’s new NEX-5N mirrorless camera for this overheating issue, and finds that you can record about 23m22s of video from a “cold start” before the camera issues a warning and shuts off automatically (the temperature indicator turns on at 12m23s).

You can supposedly record 29 minutes of footage on the camera if the sensor doesn’t overheat, though that’s probably impossible to achieve under normal circumstances — unless you’re shooting at the North Pole or something…

(via Foto Actualidad)