Posts Tagged ‘googleglasses’

Tech Journalists’ Initial Impressions of the Google Glass Camera Glasses

Developers who pre-ordered Google’s Project Glass glasses for $1,500 won’t be receiving them until early 2013, but a number of lucky journalists were recently given the opportunity to take the camera-equipped, augmented reality eye-piece for a test drive. The New York Times’ gadget kingmaker David Pogue writes that the device has the potential to be one of the rare devices that introduces a whole new gadget category to the world,

[…] a few things are clear. The speed and power, the tiny size and weight, the clarity and effectiveness of the audio and video, are beyond anything I could have imagined. The company is expending a lot of effort on design — hardware and software — which is absolutely the right approach for something as personal as a wearable gadget

[…] it’s much too soon to predict Google Glass’s success or failure. But it’s easy to see that it has potential no other machine has ever had before — and that Google is shepherding its development in exactly the right way.

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First Sample Video Shot with Google’s Camera Glasses

Yesterday we shared some new sample photos published by Google showing what its Project Glass prototype camera glasses are currently capable of. The video above is the first sample video captured using the glasses, and is a short 15-second clip showing a first person view of someone doing flips on a trampoline. With current cameras, the only way to achieve this kind of hands-free footage would be to use some kind of (relatively) unwieldy camera strapped to the head or body (e.g. a GoPro mounted on a helmet), but Google Glass would allow people to record this kind of thing by simply wearing a pair of glasses.

(via Project Glass via The Verge)

3MP Sample Photo Shows What Google Glass Will Help People Capture

Google has published a second sample photo captured using its Google Glass augmented reality glasses. This time it’s a 3MP photograph captured by Googler Sebastian Thrun while spinning with his son Jasper. It’s an interesting example of the moments people will soon be able to capture if wearable, voice-controlled cameras become a part of how we document our lives. No word on whether the camera quality has improved since the first sample photo was released, but this latest one sure looks better.

(via 1001 Noisy Cameras)

Google Glasses Make TV Appearance, Snaps Photo of Charlie Rose

Google’s Project Glass has been all the rage since the company released their mock-ups and video of the project at the beginning of the month, and for good reason — the idea is out-of-this-world cool. But from the start we’ve known that Project Glass was only in the beginning stages, the glasses were an idea that couldn’t yet do many, if any, of the things featured in that futuristic video. A couple of days ago, however, the world got its first glimpse of what Project Glass can do.

In an interview with Charlie Rose, researcher Sebastian Thrun used the glasses and his voice to snap a photo of Mr. Rose and upload it to his Google+. The photo (shown above) is nothing special — it looks like an ancient camera phone image — but it serves as confirmation that the glasses can already perform a few basic functions via voice command. And considering the speed with which technology advances these days, any indication of functionality could mean Project Glass is much further along than we think.

(via Gizmodo)

The Future: Snap and Share Photos Using Augmented Reality Glasses

If Google’s vision of the future pans out, we may soon be snapping and sharing photographs using augmented reality “glasses”. The company is working on a product that’s currently going by the code name “Project Glass“. As the concept video above shows, the aim is to have a wearable “computer” that can project useful information about the world directly into the user’s eye, allowing people to constantly interact with the Internet throughout their everyday lives. The glasses would even be able to snap photographs based on voice commands, and then instantly upload them to the web.
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